Fort de Valros

Valros, France

The Fort de Valros is a ruined small castle or fortress. The site has no visible trace of occupation from antiquity, but archaeological digs have uncovered the remains of a necropolis used from the 8th to the 10th century.

The promontory on which the fort stands is a strategic observation post. It dominates the valley of the Thongue and controls two very ancient communication routes: the roads from Béziers to Pézenas and from Saint-Thibéry to Alignan-du-Vent. From historical records, it is known that in 1199, the powerful Viscount of Béziers, Raymond Roger Trencavel, authorised his vassal Etienne de Servian to build a forcia on the podium of Valros. But, from 1210, during the Albigensian Crusade, Etienne de Servian was forced to recount, under pressure from the troops of Simon de Montfort. Thus, the fortress had only a short functioning military life. It was dismantled soon after its construction, in the first half of the 13th century. Thereafter, the site continued to be frequented by troops who took water from the cistern, which never dried up.

The small square tower nestled in the south west corner of the fortress is a remnant of the aerial telegraphy invented at the end of the 18th century by the engineer Claude Chappe (1763-1805), using semaphore signals.

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Details

Founded: 1199
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

arnaud slamani (16 months ago)
Lauriane Delacroix (17 months ago)
Michel Mercadier (18 months ago)
Lieu très bien agencé avec tables de pique-nique. Vue circulaire sur 360°. Très bel endroit !
Stephen Clamy (2 years ago)
Super beau et l'histoire du vestige est très bien expliqué ! attention aux détritus j'ai ramasse un petit sac de déchets qui gachait ce beau monument
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