The Roman Bridge at Saint-Thibéry was segmental arch bridge on the Via Domitia in southern France. The structure is dated to the reign of emperor Augustus (30 BC – 14 AD). The ancient bridge had nine arches with spans of 10–12 m. The roadway rested on wide piers, which were protected on both sides by arched floodways and large cutwaters. The original length of the structure is estimated as 150 m, its road width as 4 m. The missing spans are known to have been destroyed by flood some time before 1536.

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Founded: 30 BC to 14 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jean-Bernard Busset (3 years ago)
Bel endroit à d'y accéder du bon côté de la rivière Hérault.
Eric Godart (3 years ago)
Très bel ensemble d’époque différente mais très complémentaire ! À voir absolument
bertollo laurent (4 years ago)
Super endroit
Maxime LMA (4 years ago)
Un pont antique romain partiellement détruit qui fait face au moulin "à bled " de saint thiebery. Ses arches tiennent encore presque miraculeusement face au courant parfois déchaîner de l'Hérault. Il peut faire penser au pont d'Avignon dans le style " pont detruit"
Robert West (5 years ago)
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