Agen Cathedral

Agen, France

Agen Cathedral's (Cathédrale Saint-Caprais d'Agen) visible structure dates back to the 12th century. It was built as a collegiate church of canons dedicated to Saint Caprasius, on the foundations of a basilica sacked by the Normans in 853 but thereafter restored.

Sacked again in December 1561 during the Wars of Religion, by two years after the countrywide coup d'état that took place in 1789, the cathedral had come to store fodder before being reopened in 1796 and being elevated to the status of the city's cathedral in 1801. This new cathedral replaced the old cathedral in the town, which was destroyed during the French Revolution, thereby becoming the bishop's seat in the diocese.

The cathedral appears in one of the earliest color photographs ever taken by Louis Arthur Ducos du Hauron in 1877.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leslie Mrtn (18 months ago)
Lieu de visite agréable et balade aux alentours sympas
Jean-Eudes Méhus (20 months ago)
Magnifique. Une cathédrale comme j'en ai rarement visité. L'extérieur est atypique par son architecture qui "remonte le temps". Elle est chaleureuse et généreuse, typique des bâtiments du sud de la France. L'intérieur est coloré et décoré à merveille, ce qui est rare comparé à l'austérité habituelle des lieux de la plupart des lieux de culte en France. De plus, la cathédrale vient d'être entièrement rénovée ce qui lui donne un cachet tout particulier.
FANTON Yves-alain (20 months ago)
Magnifique cathédrale, très bien décorée et toujours ouverte. Les fresques sont de véritables livres de la bible et de catéchisme. L'entretien est assuré. On peut juste regretter l'absence d'un musée trésors de la cathédrale
Bernard Bonafous (20 months ago)
Très beau coeur d'église. Bon recueillement.
Mad_Dog_Dak _ (3 years ago)
Cool cathédrale inside town center
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