Condom Cathedral

Condom, France

Condom Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter. The cathedral dominates the town, which sits on a hill above the Baïse River. It was designed at the end of the 15th century and erected from 1506 to 1531, making it one of the last major buildings in the Gers region to be constructed in the Gothic style of south-west France. The church has buttresses all around and there is a 40-metre square tower over the west front. The west front door has the Four Evangelists' symbols in the tympanum, and the south nave door in the Flamboyant Gothic style has 24 small statues in the niches of the archivolt.

Inside, the wide aisleless nave is lit by the clerestory windows with grisaille glass. There is a neo-Gothic openwork screen from 1844 around the chancel, which demarcates it from the ambulatory. The stained glass in the choir is from the 19th century. This cathedral was famous for its sumptuous 16th-century liturgy and for its organ of 1605 at the west end. This is commemorated in the choir vault bosses with figures of angel musicians. The original pulpit with its delicately carved stone baldaquin is still in place. The 16th-century cloister is now a public passageway adjoining a car park, the exterior of which is illuminated at night.

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Details

Founded: 1506-1531
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Brown (8 months ago)
All of the churches in Europe are interesting and this one is no different.
aRandy (9 months ago)
Not very good, my girlfriend said the ride was a bit too rough and rocky with this type of condom and it is slightly too large and inflexible. We would both recommend Trojan condoms instead.
Adam Mills (10 months ago)
A very interesting place
Simon Chaperon (12 months ago)
Beautiful so historic well worth a visit
Conrad (12 months ago)
Ummmm, can anyone point out how this town got this bizarre name? xD
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