Santa Maria dei Miracoli Church

Venice, Italy

Santa Maria dei Miracoli, also known as the 'marble church', it is one of the best examples of the early Venetian Renaissance including colored marble, a false colonnade on the exterior walls (pilasters), and a semicircular pediment. 

Built between 1481 and 1489 by Pietro Lombardo to house a miraculous icon of the Virgin Mary. The plans for the church were expanded in 1484 to include the construction of a new convent for nuns of St. Clare to the east. The convent was connected to the gallery of the church by an enclosed walkway that was later destroyed.

The interior is enclosed by a wide barrel vault, with a single nave. The nave is dominated by an ornamental marble stair rising between two pulpits, with statues by Tullio Lombardo, Alessandro Vittoria and Nicolò di Pietro. The vaulted ceiling is divided into fifty coffers decorated with paintings of prophets, a work by Girolamo Pennacchi's contemporaries, Vincenzo dalle Destre and Lattanzio da Rimini.

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Founded: 1481-1489
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

吳天雋 (2 years ago)
One of the most magnificent church I've visited.
Ali Rehman (2 years ago)
We did not visit this Venetian Church. However the area where the Church is located is gorgeous
carlos ruiz (3 years ago)
Every where is nice you will fall in love with the city people and food and wine
Jas Ancheta (3 years ago)
Beautiful church fully covered with different types of marble. Entrance is 3 euros.
Steve B (3 years ago)
Visited here for a Sunday morning mass. The atmosphere was very authentic and they were happy to have a non Italian speaking tourist. Very friendly.
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