The Museo Correr has rich and varied collections of art and history of Venice. The Museo Correr originated with the collection bequeathed to the city of Venice in 1830 by Teodoro Correr. A member of a traditional Venetian family, Correr was a meticulous and passionate collector, dedicating most of his life to the collection of both works of art and documents or individual objects that reflected the history of Venice. Upon his death, all this material was donated to the city, together with the family's Grand Canal palace which then housed it. The nobleman also left the city funds to be used in conserving and extending the collections and in making them available to the public.

The first floor of the Museo Correr illustrates the life and culture of the Venetian Republic over the centuries of its political grandeur and independence. Beginning in Room 19, the art collection is divided into two parts. On the first floor, four rooms house the collection of small bronzes, including pieces by Veneto region sculptors from the late 15th to the first decades of the 17th century. On the second floor, 19 rooms display the Picture Gallery, which focuses primarily on Venetian painting up to the 16th century. There are also rooms dedicated to maiolica-work and to carved ivories.

The Picture Gallery starts at the end of Room 14 and comprises examples of Venetian paintings from the very earliest days right up to the beginning of the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 1830
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marina Marchese (11 months ago)
The printing R-Evolution at the Correr Museum in St. Mark's Square..a must see. Been here 3x. Great exhibit.
Adriana Perez (11 months ago)
This is a very large museum that requires a lot of time and attention. It is neatly organized and spread out through a large space. The museum has lots of byzantine art as well as busts from famous characters in the history of Europe. It was nice to see the large paintings, which are elaborately made with beautiful art techniques, colors and materials. My only criticism would be that some areas of the museum seemed too spread out and it is rather large so it takes A LONG time to go through it.
Robin Lauwaert (12 months ago)
I would recommend visiting this museum when you are in Venice, totally worth it. You also get a great view over the San Marco square while walking through the halls of the museum. You can see paintings, archeological discoveries, the national library, decorated rooms and much more.
Lu Yang (13 months ago)
An art museum set in Saint mark's square in Venice, this place has exhibitions of Venetian art from the 1300s to the 1600s. The palace is tastefully decorated and has been used by nobility in the past. The have interesting scale models of the galleys used by Venice in the 1400s. They also had a temporary exhibition on the history of painting which I found quite illuminating. Lots of books from the 1400s and their associated prices, compared with other market goods like wine, shoes and beef for an idea of prices.
Chris Canelake (2 years ago)
We really enjoyed the Correr. There was a great mix of art, both modern and classic. Everything is really well curated with extremely interesting and provocative content and explanations. It was a great visit and the little cafe was a very pleasant place to recharge.
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