Palazzo della Ragione

Padua, Italy

The Palazzo della Ragione is a medieval town hall in Padua. The building, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 81.5m, its breadth 27m, and its height 24 m; the walls are covered with allegorical frescoes; the building stands on arches, and the upper storey is surrounded by an open loggia, not unlike that which surrounds the Basilica Palladiana in Vicenza.

The Palazzo was begun in 1172 and finished in 1219. In 1306, Fra Giovanni, an Augustinian friar, covered the whole with one roof; originally there were three roofs, spanning the three chambers into which the hall was at first divided; the internal partition walls remained till the fire of 1420, when the Venetian architects who undertook the restoration removed them, throwing all three spaces into one and forming the present great hall, the Salone. The new space was refrescoed by Nicolò Miretto and Stefano da Ferrara, working from 1425 to 1440.

A tornado destroyed the roof and damaged the building on 17 August 1756.

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Address

Sotto Il Salone 51, Padua, Italy
See all sites in Padua

Details

Founded: 1172-1219
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

O. M. (7 months ago)
The most antique gourmet food shopping center in the world in the ground floor with the government mediaeval saloon on the first floor now Museum
Davide Lionzo (14 months ago)
Fantastic palace, definitely worth visiting it. Inside the Foucault pendulum.
Sib-gha Safdar (15 months ago)
The huge wooden horse on one side of the room is striking. I think it’s the largest medieval room. For those in padova,absolutely a stop to do.....
Sinziana Istrate (17 months ago)
Beautiful Padova in all her historical splendor!
Aurora Musilli (2 years ago)
It's an amazing masterpiece full of frescoes. Full of history. I really wish I had time to watch and read ALL the section of the virtual free guide that is inside.
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