Palazzo della Ragione

Padua, Italy

The Palazzo della Ragione is a medieval town hall in Padua. The building, with its great hall on the upper floor, is reputed to have the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe; the hall is nearly rectangular, its length 81.5m, its breadth 27m, and its height 24 m; the walls are covered with allegorical frescoes; the building stands on arches, and the upper storey is surrounded by an open loggia, not unlike that which surrounds the Basilica Palladiana in Vicenza.

The Palazzo was begun in 1172 and finished in 1219. In 1306, Fra Giovanni, an Augustinian friar, covered the whole with one roof; originally there were three roofs, spanning the three chambers into which the hall was at first divided; the internal partition walls remained till the fire of 1420, when the Venetian architects who undertook the restoration removed them, throwing all three spaces into one and forming the present great hall, the Salone. The new space was refrescoed by Nicolò Miretto and Stefano da Ferrara, working from 1425 to 1440.

A tornado destroyed the roof and damaged the building on 17 August 1756.

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Address

Sotto Il Salone 51, Padua, Italy
See all sites in Padua

Details

Founded: 1172-1219
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Federico C. (20 months ago)
Must to visit in Padua! It has the largest roof unsupported by columns in Europe. The inside walls are covered with frescoes
Stefan Stehning (21 months ago)
It's very nice but also very expensive. We paied 4€(student price) and it's a nice and big hall but no more.
Dina George (21 months ago)
It holds different expositions. And the market square is soo lively.
Alí Segovia (22 months ago)
Amazing paintings. Little museum with not so many things to see.
carlos ruiz (2 years ago)
Lovely place to take pictutes at night time lovely people
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