University of Padua

Padua, Italy

The University of Padua was founded in 1222 as a school of law and was one of the most prominent universities in early modern Europe. Padua is the second-oldest university in Italy and the world's fifth-oldest surviving university. 

Since 1595, Padua's famous anatomical theatre drew artists and scientists studying the human body during public dissections. It is the oldest surviving permanent anatomical theatre in Europe. Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica. The book triggered great public interest in dissections and caused many other European cities to establish anatomical theatres.

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    Details

    Founded: 1222
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    More Information

    www.unipd.it
    en.wikipedia.org

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    4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Nilesh Dodiyar (2 years ago)
    The university for the country of Italy. Wonderful.
    Nahid Hasan (3 years ago)
    My dreaming university. I wish to see this university only one time.
    Narsa Reddy (3 years ago)
    Best CLG
    Andrea Marcelli (4 years ago)
    Read my story and avoid: this Uni is like cancer. Horrible and dreadful experience. I am a graduate student enrolled in a course that is offered jointly by both University of Padua and University of Venice. Apparently, even though I had been assured my study plan had been approved, it is nowhere to be found in Padua's learning management system. Some 5 months later I was informed it was up to me to communicate it to the other host Unviersity (what?!). This resulted in a second process of enrollment (so that now I have two e-mails, two student numbers, two study plans, etc.). Even so, my study plan is nowhere to be found. Now it's June and I would like to take some exams, but I am unable to do so. Consider I enrolled because of some bureaucratic requirements for teaching at high school (requirements I don't meet because I have lived in Australia for quite a long time). I spent 2000 € in fees but the most basic features (such as: ability to enrol in a subject and take the exam have not been implemented. After talking to other fellow students, it turned out student services don't read the e-mails they receive and hardly ever answer the phone. In fact, even the Uni call centre was unable to help and suggested me to include the word "URGENT" in the object of my e-mail, with the hope of catching their attention. So far, not even the reception of my e-mails has been acknowledged. I work 40 hrs a week and do not understand: if I do have the time to make a phone call, how comes an entire Facutly is unable to respond? We are 8 months into my course, for Heaven's sake... and my career depends on it. Never again. I don't even understand why, after so many years abroad, I allowed myself to be scammed by such an "Institution".
    Gordana Podvezanec (4 years ago)
    Beautiful building. Noted university. The place where Galileo thought. The begining of the modern medicine. The guided visit is a must and very informative one too
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    Heraclea Lyncestis

    Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

    Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

    The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

    Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

    In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

    The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

    The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.