University of Padua

Padua, Italy

The University of Padua was founded in 1222 as a school of law and was one of the most prominent universities in early modern Europe. Padua is the second-oldest university in Italy and the world's fifth-oldest surviving university. 

Since 1595, Padua's famous anatomical theatre drew artists and scientists studying the human body during public dissections. It is the oldest surviving permanent anatomical theatre in Europe. Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica. The book triggered great public interest in dissections and caused many other European cities to establish anatomical theatres.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 1222
    Category:

    More Information

    www.unipd.it
    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Haseeb Akbar (13 months ago)
    Best place!
    luky Luciana (14 months ago)
    Hello ... very qualified health workers work here, very well trained on a professional and also human level, who know how to carry out their work day by day for people who need care, they need certainties and answers to their problems. Sincere thanks to all of them
    Aurélien Demont (15 months ago)
    I pursued an Erasmus internship at the department of information engineering and did not regret it. This is one of the best place to go in an Erasmus program. The people is great and the minds and ideas are bright.
    silvio garola (2 years ago)
    It's amazing. One of the oldest an historical university in the world
    Anand Priya Deo (2 years ago)
    This university is very close to Venice. I have lived in Paduva for a long time and I used to visit this university very frequently. It has a wonderful architecture and it is actually a very old university.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Redipuglia World War I Memorial

    Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

    The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.