University of Padua

Padua, Italy

The University of Padua was founded in 1222 as a school of law and was one of the most prominent universities in early modern Europe. Padua is the second-oldest university in Italy and the world's fifth-oldest surviving university. 

Since 1595, Padua's famous anatomical theatre drew artists and scientists studying the human body during public dissections. It is the oldest surviving permanent anatomical theatre in Europe. Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica. The book triggered great public interest in dissections and caused many other European cities to establish anatomical theatres.

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    Founded: 1222
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    More Information

    www.unipd.it
    en.wikipedia.org

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    User Reviews

    Haseeb Akbar (4 months ago)
    Best place!
    luky Luciana (5 months ago)
    Hello ... very qualified health workers work here, very well trained on a professional and also human level, who know how to carry out their work day by day for people who need care, they need certainties and answers to their problems. Sincere thanks to all of them
    Aurélien Demont (6 months ago)
    I pursued an Erasmus internship at the department of information engineering and did not regret it. This is one of the best place to go in an Erasmus program. The people is great and the minds and ideas are bright.
    silvio garola (18 months ago)
    It's amazing. One of the oldest an historical university in the world
    Anand Priya Deo (19 months ago)
    This university is very close to Venice. I have lived in Paduva for a long time and I used to visit this university very frequently. It has a wonderful architecture and it is actually a very old university.
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