University of Padua

Padua, Italy

The University of Padua was founded in 1222 as a school of law and was one of the most prominent universities in early modern Europe. Padua is the second-oldest university in Italy and the world's fifth-oldest surviving university. 

Since 1595, Padua's famous anatomical theatre drew artists and scientists studying the human body during public dissections. It is the oldest surviving permanent anatomical theatre in Europe. Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica. The book triggered great public interest in dissections and caused many other European cities to establish anatomical theatres.

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    Details

    Founded: 1222
    Category:

    More Information

    www.unipd.it
    en.wikipedia.org

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    4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Nilesh Dodiyar (18 months ago)
    The university for the country of Italy. Wonderful.
    Nahid Hasan (2 years ago)
    My dreaming university. I wish to see this university only one time.
    Narsa Reddy (2 years ago)
    Best CLG
    Andrea Marcelli (3 years ago)
    Read my story and avoid: this Uni is like cancer. Horrible and dreadful experience. I am a graduate student enrolled in a course that is offered jointly by both University of Padua and University of Venice. Apparently, even though I had been assured my study plan had been approved, it is nowhere to be found in Padua's learning management system. Some 5 months later I was informed it was up to me to communicate it to the other host Unviersity (what?!). This resulted in a second process of enrollment (so that now I have two e-mails, two student numbers, two study plans, etc.). Even so, my study plan is nowhere to be found. Now it's June and I would like to take some exams, but I am unable to do so. Consider I enrolled because of some bureaucratic requirements for teaching at high school (requirements I don't meet because I have lived in Australia for quite a long time). I spent 2000 € in fees but the most basic features (such as: ability to enrol in a subject and take the exam have not been implemented. After talking to other fellow students, it turned out student services don't read the e-mails they receive and hardly ever answer the phone. In fact, even the Uni call centre was unable to help and suggested me to include the word "URGENT" in the object of my e-mail, with the hope of catching their attention. So far, not even the reception of my e-mails has been acknowledged. I work 40 hrs a week and do not understand: if I do have the time to make a phone call, how comes an entire Facutly is unable to respond? We are 8 months into my course, for Heaven's sake... and my career depends on it. Never again. I don't even understand why, after so many years abroad, I allowed myself to be scammed by such an "Institution".
    Gordana Podvezanec (3 years ago)
    Beautiful building. Noted university. The place where Galileo thought. The begining of the modern medicine. The guided visit is a must and very informative one too
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