University of Padua

Padua, Italy

The University of Padua was founded in 1222 as a school of law and was one of the most prominent universities in early modern Europe. Padua is the second-oldest university in Italy and the world's fifth-oldest surviving university. 

Since 1595, Padua's famous anatomical theatre drew artists and scientists studying the human body during public dissections. It is the oldest surviving permanent anatomical theatre in Europe. Anatomist Andreas Vesalius held the chair of Surgery and Anatomy (explicator chirurgiae) and in 1543 published his anatomical discoveries in De Humani Corporis Fabrica. The book triggered great public interest in dissections and caused many other European cities to establish anatomical theatres.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 1222
    Category:

    More Information

    www.unipd.it
    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Nilesh Dodiyar (2 years ago)
    The university for the country of Italy. Wonderful.
    Nahid Hasan (3 years ago)
    My dreaming university. I wish to see this university only one time.
    Narsa Reddy (3 years ago)
    Best CLG
    Andrea Marcelli (4 years ago)
    Read my story and avoid: this Uni is like cancer. Horrible and dreadful experience. I am a graduate student enrolled in a course that is offered jointly by both University of Padua and University of Venice. Apparently, even though I had been assured my study plan had been approved, it is nowhere to be found in Padua's learning management system. Some 5 months later I was informed it was up to me to communicate it to the other host Unviersity (what?!). This resulted in a second process of enrollment (so that now I have two e-mails, two student numbers, two study plans, etc.). Even so, my study plan is nowhere to be found. Now it's June and I would like to take some exams, but I am unable to do so. Consider I enrolled because of some bureaucratic requirements for teaching at high school (requirements I don't meet because I have lived in Australia for quite a long time). I spent 2000 € in fees but the most basic features (such as: ability to enrol in a subject and take the exam have not been implemented. After talking to other fellow students, it turned out student services don't read the e-mails they receive and hardly ever answer the phone. In fact, even the Uni call centre was unable to help and suggested me to include the word "URGENT" in the object of my e-mail, with the hope of catching their attention. So far, not even the reception of my e-mails has been acknowledged. I work 40 hrs a week and do not understand: if I do have the time to make a phone call, how comes an entire Facutly is unable to respond? We are 8 months into my course, for Heaven's sake... and my career depends on it. Never again. I don't even understand why, after so many years abroad, I allowed myself to be scammed by such an "Institution".
    Gordana Podvezanec (4 years ago)
    Beautiful building. Noted university. The place where Galileo thought. The begining of the modern medicine. The guided visit is a must and very informative one too
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Palazzo Colonna

    The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

    The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

    With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

    Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

    The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

    The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

    Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.