Padua Botanical Garden

Padua, Italy

The Orto Botanico di Padova is a botanical garden in Padua, founded in 1545 by the Venetian Republic. It is the world's oldest academic botanical garden that is still in its original location. The garden, affiliated with the University of Padua, currently covers roughly 22,000 square meters, and is known for its special collections and historical design.

A circular wall enclosure was built to protect the garden from the frequent night thefts which occurred in spite of severe penalties (fines, prison, exile). The Botanical Garden was steadily enriched with plants from all over the world, particularly from the countries that participated in trade with Venice. Consequently, Padua had a leading role in the introduction and study of many exotic plants, and a herbarium, a library and many laboratories were gradually added to its Botanical Garden.

At present, the Botanical Garden allows for intensive didactic activity as well as important research to be conducted on its grounds. It also cares for the preservation of many rare species. In 1997, it was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site on the following grounds:

The Botanical Garden of Padua is the original of all botanical gardens throughout the world, and represents the birth of science, of scientific exchanges, and understanding of the relationship between nature and culture. It has made a profound contribution to the development of many modern scientific disciplines, notably botany, medicine, chemistry, ecology and pharmacy.

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Founded: 1545
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nivaldo Covolan (Nyko461) (12 months ago)
Very different botanical garden and very educational. All plants have their names and they are very well kept. On my opinion the entrance tickets are too expensive and the facility has very few number of toilet and no water fountain to the visitor. I have been in other gardens good as this one for only a symbolic ticket price.
Davide Lionzo (12 months ago)
The garden is beautiful. When you go there it's difficult to believe you are at the center of the city. I have appreciated more the old part of the garden but it's definitely worth a visit
Rhen Taylor (12 months ago)
See nearly every major plant in the world here. Phenomenal garden full of the botanical wonders archived in an interesting and fun to explore area. A must visit in Padova.
Paolo Schiattarella (14 months ago)
UNESCO heritage protected site. Very old but well kept. All in order. Plants from all over the world and everything looks so clean and in good status. The ticket office is very well organized. Extremely pleasant to visit and to stay for a bit. Not huge but not even small for a relatively small city like Padua. A must see place if one is in town.
Antonín Janeček (2 years ago)
Cheap botanic garden as it is big and very beautiful plants. Best botanic garden where I was. It really worth it look through garden.
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