Padua Botanical Garden

Padua, Italy

The Orto Botanico di Padova is a botanical garden in Padua, founded in 1545 by the Venetian Republic. It is the world's oldest academic botanical garden that is still in its original location. The garden, affiliated with the University of Padua, currently covers roughly 22,000 square meters, and is known for its special collections and historical design.

A circular wall enclosure was built to protect the garden from the frequent night thefts which occurred in spite of severe penalties (fines, prison, exile). The Botanical Garden was steadily enriched with plants from all over the world, particularly from the countries that participated in trade with Venice. Consequently, Padua had a leading role in the introduction and study of many exotic plants, and a herbarium, a library and many laboratories were gradually added to its Botanical Garden.

At present, the Botanical Garden allows for intensive didactic activity as well as important research to be conducted on its grounds. It also cares for the preservation of many rare species. In 1997, it was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site on the following grounds:

The Botanical Garden of Padua is the original of all botanical gardens throughout the world, and represents the birth of science, of scientific exchanges, and understanding of the relationship between nature and culture. It has made a profound contribution to the development of many modern scientific disciplines, notably botany, medicine, chemistry, ecology and pharmacy.

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Founded: 1545
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Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ivan D (16 months ago)
very nice place to visit. please note that it closes at 17.00!!!!
Илия Илиев (16 months ago)
Overpriced and poorly organised. Not really well maintained. Albeit very old and preserved since 1545 - has nothing really interesting to offer. Overall - nothing special. Do not reconend.
Talitha Falconer (16 months ago)
Beautiful plants, large variety from all over the world. I reccomend spending extra money to get a private tour. You understand much more when someone is explaining it to you.
Yuri Ussar D'Andria (16 months ago)
Big and very nice. It has a big selection of plants and an inside part where you can learn something interesting about plants. Even the illegal ones.
Giulio Caccin (18 months ago)
Visit this place, but please first study it's story and plan your visit in order to understand properly what you are gonna see. Nature it's constrained only to show her best in the middle of an incredible city. Please phone in advance if you have disabilities.
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