Palazzo dei Trecento

Treviso, Italy

Palazzo dei Trecento is located in the Piazza dei Signori of Treviso  and it is home to municipal council. The palace was erected in the 13th and 14th centuries, as the seat of the Maggior Consiglio ('Highest Council'), the main administrative council in the city. Built in brickworks, it has two floors, the lower one entered through a loggia. The upper floor has three triple mullioned windows.

Internally, there are remains of frescoes painted from the 14th to the 16th centuries by Venetian artists, depicting coat of arms and themes of civil power and justice. On the southern walls are a Madonna with Child and 'St. Liberalis with Peter and the Cardinal Virtues.

In 1944 the palace was bombed by Allied planes and nearly destroyed.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Gernot Berndt (4 months ago)
Palazzo dei Trecento war Sitz des Großen Rates, der aus 300 Mitglieder bestand. Er zählt zu den ältesten erhaltenen Kommunalpalästen Italiens und war Vorbild für viele andere im Veneto und in Oberitalien. Erbaut wahrscheinlich 1213. Er beherbergt einen großen Saal (46,5 x 20 m) mit offenem Dachstuhl, Zugang über die Außentreppe an der Piazza Indipendenza.
Veronica Bonura (7 months ago)
The fourteenth century building is located in the heart of Treviso. A totally frescoed room where there are temporary exhibitions. I could see the one on the playing cards ... Wonderful. Free entry. Date of my visit: 7/03/20
ermes tuon (ErmesT) (8 months ago)
Palace of the fourteenth century is the symbol of the city, as well as the seat of the city council. Unfortunately, just as the seat of the council, it is not easily visited, if not during exhibitions and events. Another fantastic feature is the underlying loggia with large arches that support the building. Must see inside walls painted with the insignia of all the "Dear" medieval
Olivia L (2 years ago)
Walking in the streets of Italy, there are many churches, castles and history relics. Before we have dinner in the evening that we walk here. Streets are spacious, distance between the buildings and people can make you feel comfortable, and there are not many cars In the evening Many people is walking the dog here. It's not a famous sightseeing spot but still charming for me
gregory uduebholo (2 years ago)
It was nice
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