King's College in Old Aberdeen is a formerly independent university founded in 1495 and now an integral part of the University of Aberdeen. Its historic buildings are the centrepiece of the University of Aberdeen's Old Aberdeen campus, often known as the King's or King's College campus.

The focal point of the college, as well as its oldest building, is the late 15th century King's College Chapel. A number of other historic buildings remain, with others being subject to renovation and rebuilding in the 18th and 19th centuries. In the early 20th century, a great deal of expansion saw the university buildings increase around the historic college buildings. In the later 20th century, the university expanded dramatically in size, dominating Old Aberdeen and expanding out from the High Street with a number of modern buildings.

Construction of the King's College Chapel began in 1498 and ended with the consecration of the building in 1509. The most notable architectural feature of the Chapel is its Crown Tower, which has become an icon of the university as a whole.

Particularly notable within the chapel are the choir stalls and rood screen, which date back to around 1509. These form the most complete mediaeval church interior in Scotland. Since 1928, the antechapel has been used as the university's war memorial: five hundred and twenty-four students of the university are commemorated on its walls, having fallen in the First and Second World Wars.

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    Founded: 1495
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    4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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    Mr C (5 years ago)
    Beautiful old building which hosts lectures (usually Maths and History).
    Christian Bloch (5 years ago)
    It's worth a quick visit from outside.
    Baldur Þór Finnsson (5 years ago)
    Hands down the most beautiful building I´ve ever had the honor of studying in!!
    Brianna Charteris (5 years ago)
    Beautiful building, worth a visit if you're in Aberdeen and it's a nice walk out of the busy main shopping area.
    Steven Schafer (6 years ago)
    Gorgeous place. Much of the original craftsmanship survived the reformation. A must see.
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