Drum Castle was for centuries the seat of Clan Irvine. The original 13th-century tower of Drum Castle has been suggested as the work of medieval architect Richard Cementarius, who built the Bridge of Don in Old Aberdeen. It is believed to be one of the three oldest tower houses in Scotland (and notably unaltered). A large wing was added in 1619 by the 9th laird, and further alterations were made during the Victorian era.

The castle and its grounds were granted to William de Irwyn in 1325 by Robert the Bruce, and remained in the possession of Clan Irvine until 1975. William de Irwyn was armour bearer/secretary to King Robert the Bruce. Drum played a role in the Covenanting Rebellion leading to its being attacked and sacked three times.

The castle is surrounded by late 18th-century gardens, including a rose garden and arboretum containing trees from all regions of the 18th century British Empire.

Today, the castle is owned by the National Trust for Scotland and is open during the summer months. The chapel, dining hall and estate may be hired for weddings and corporate functions. A variety of local events such as classic car rallies and musical fetes also occur here. There is also a small shop and tearoom within the castle.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

EXA FROM THE ASHES (37 days ago)
We thoroughly enjoyed exploring this castle. The hot tea and crumpets were delicious as well. I love how the history seaps into one's body. The gardens are simply delightful.
Christine Bell (2 months ago)
I really enjoyed my visit to Drum. The guide presented background information in a well informed and interactive way. Would have liked to wander in the grounds but prevented because of the weather. Would recommend a visit.
Cyclizine (3 months ago)
Fine for a gentle stroll around the grounds. Good kids' play area too!
Gary Newell (5 months ago)
Drum Castle looks great from the outside and the tour inside starts off brilliantly with some fantastic paintings. The castle itself feels very grand. when you hit the second floor it becomes an art gallery with rooms full of photos (not in keeping with the feel of the castle but more at home in the Tate). The rooms are empty except for the photos on white walls. This takes away from the building's character The one way system then takes you back downstairs and you find yourself at the exit and the tour is finished with barely any of the castle explored. The huge tower you see in the photos has no access to it which is disappointing. A great looking castle and the first part of the tour is excellent but it fails off into something a little more disappointing for my taste.
Carlos Leyon Fernandez (5 months ago)
The castle is about a half hour drive from Aberdeen. It’s got a rose garden that’s worth visiting when the roses are in full bloom. There’s ample parking space and parking costs £3. There’s an entry fee for the castle as well. There are a few walks that take you around the estate. It’s a beautiful place to visit on a sunny day.
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