Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Inverurie, United Kingdom

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.

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Details

Founded: 2000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Boorman (7 months ago)
A beautiful tranquil spot. A bit different to find but so well worth it. The views around are stunning
Kenneth McKay (8 months ago)
Simply outstanding! Stunning monument, stunning views. The road to it is in need of some repair but it's OK if you take it easy. The circle itself is one of the finest you'll see.
Mark Murphy (8 months ago)
Such a wonderful experience. Saw a beautiful young couple from Spain away to get their wedding photos taken as we were leaving
Andy Lawson (13 months ago)
Good circle, possibly rebuilt as many are in this area. The recumbant and flankers are pretty massive but not the biggest. This circle is definitely one of the best kept, good parking, some info and good views.
Iain Stuart (2 years ago)
Great walk
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