Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Inverurie, United Kingdom

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.

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Details

Founded: 2000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elina Skudra (2 years ago)
Worth to visit if you're in Inverurie. Short walk. Not the easiest place to find, sign not visible if you come from A96.
Chris John Third (2 years ago)
It's a great site to visit. You can go on an extended walk in the area or just visit the stones. You need to walk up hill to see them but it's a gentle hill. A good place to start if you are planning in visiting some stone circles in the area.
Andrew Lawson (2 years ago)
Good circle, good parking, some info and good views.
john mckay (2 years ago)
excellent place and fantastic woodland walks nearby.Very serene.
Hans Salm-Hoogstraeten (2 years ago)
Really Like Outlander - almost passed to the middle ages
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