Château de Cambiaire was built in the 14th century in the town of Saint-Étienne-Vallée-Française. It is a quadrangular building with a round tower at three of its corners and a square tower at the northwest corner. It consists of three wings around a courtyard on the west side by a battlements surrounding wall pierced by a gate. The great crenellated tower, which dungeon office, is crowned on its summit terrace of a watchtower with a roof shaped pepper shakers. This square building built shale stone mixed with white quartz is the oldest. It has three levels, the first two date from the 14th century, the last level and the spiral staircase from a raising of the late 15th century.

This tower seems more ostentatious than most military as much as the castle was never the castle of Saint-Etienne. One of the ground pavement dwelling is probably contemporary dungeon. The others are the result of rearrangements of the modern era and those of the late nineteenth century and finally repairs arising out the 1944 fire. A park of chestnut trees and cedars surrounds the castle. There is a replica of the Lourdes grotto and a chapel dating back to 1875 in neo-Gothic style.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ll Ll (2 years ago)
Luis Brito (2 years ago)
Agathe B (3 years ago)
Propriétaires très sympathiques. Le château est très authentique à l'extérieur et extrêmement bien rénové à l'intérieur, avec des chambres confortables, modernes mais décorées avec goût.
Annie Langelus (4 years ago)
BennoBGl (6 years ago)
Altes Schloss, einfach renoviert. Hier darf keine Luxusherberge erwartet werden. Aber die Zimmer sind groß, sauber und ordentlich. Unser Zimmer hatte ein sehr schönes Bad. Die Lage ist traumhaft. In den kleinen Ort kommt man über Hinterhöfe und Gassen. Der Besitzer ist sehr freundlich, das Frühstück okay. Wer nicht Luxus sucht sondern eher etwas Authentisches dürfte hier zufrieden sein.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Augustusburg Palace

Augustusburg Palace represents one of the first examples of Rococo creations in Germany. For the Cologne elector and archbishop Clemens August of the House of Wittelsbach it was the favourite residence. In 1725 the Westphalian architect Johann Conrad Schlaun was commissioned by Clemens August to begin the construction of the palace on the ruins of a medieval moated castle.

In 1728, the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés took over and made the palace into one of the most glorious residences of its time. Until its completion in 1768, numerous outstanding artists of European renown contributed to its beauty. A prime example of the calibre of artists employed here is Balthasar Neumann, who created the design for the magnificent staircase, an enchanting creation full of dynamism and elegance. The magical interplay of architecture, sculpture, painting and garden design made the Brühl Palaces a masterpiece of German Rococo.

UNESCO honoured history and present of the Rococo Palaces by inscribing Augustusburg Palace – together with Falkenlust Palace and their extensive gardens – on the World Heritage List in 1984. From 1949 onwards, Augustusburg Palace was used for representative purposes by the German Federal President and the Federal Government for many decades.

In 1728, Dominique Girard designed the palace gardens according to French models. Owing to constant renovation and care, it is today one of the most authentic examples of 18th century garden design in Europe. Next to the Baroque gardens, Peter Joseph Lenné redesigned the forested areas based on English landscaping models. Today it is a wonderful place to have a walk.