The Roman bridge in Sommières is 190m long. It was built on the instructions of Emperor Tiberius at the start of the 1st century. It was restored in the 18th century. At the town end of the bridge is the gothic town gate known as the 'Tour de l'Horloge'. Only 7 of the 19 arches can be seen, the others lie beneath the town where they act as cellars.

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Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Verriere (2 years ago)
Accueil excellent, on faisait des recherches sur la ville et on a été extrêmement bien renseigné.
Jean François Fremaux (2 years ago)
Très bien merci.
fab roj (2 years ago)
Sommières. Idéalement située. C est un joli grand village au niveau de l architecture. Pour le reste c est sale ...très sale.. comme si le moyen âge devait resté pregnant. Une frange de la population hésite entre alcool et fumer des joints même lorsque vous manger en terrasse et en famille. Tout est gaché par un manque de civisme d un autre temps.... C edt dommage il y a tout pour être top... un marché diurne un marché nocturne des commerçants supers et accueillants. Des personnalités typiques atypiques vraiment sympatiques. Des points de départ rando pédestre et VTT de très bonnes factures... reste à soigner la propreté et le manque de civisme et de citoyenneté ....
Henk van Doorn (3 years ago)
Prettige mensen met veel enthousiasme over de omgeving kunnen vertellen. Voor ons was het de start om hier vakantie te houden.
Tom Banfield (5 years ago)
Very helpful, well organized office
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Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

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During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

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Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.