Château de Saint-Saturnin

Saint-Saturnin, France

Château de Saint-Saturnin is composed of three round towers and a one square tower. The oldest record is related to Crown in the 13th century. The castle was expanded in the 17th century, but gradually abandoned after the French Revolution.

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Saint-Saturnin, France
See all sites in Saint-Saturnin

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gaboriaud Christophe (2 years ago)
Très jolie village et très jolie château
Gaetan (2 years ago)
ce village est une belle surprise, visible depuis l'autoroute, au pied du causse avec des sources d'eau fraiche qui jaillissent de la montagne. Belle église, château charmant, une belle promenade à faire !
Nils Vaneffenterre (2 years ago)
L’A75 offre une très belle vue sur le château ! Heureusement que ma voiture fait du 80km/h en montée, j’ai pu le voir plus longtemps.
Roland-henri FAGES (2 years ago)
Très beau cadre. Le cirque de Saint-Saturnin est magnifique. Beau village
laurent deg (2 years ago)
Magnifique château en bas de l autoroute. Superbe travail de restauration. Tours rondes,carrées
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