Issogne Castle

Issogne, Italy

Issogne Castle is one of the most famous manors of the region, and is located on the right bank of the Dora Baltea. As a seigniorial residence of the Renaissance, the Castle has quite a different look from that of the austere Verrès Castle, which is located in Verrès, on the opposite bank of the river.

Issogne Castle is most noteworthy for its fountain in the form of pomegranate tree and its highly decorated portico, a rare example of medieval Alpine painting, with its frescoed cycle of scenes of daily life from the late Middle Ages.

The earliest mention of the castle of Issogne is in a Papal bull issued by Pope Eugene III in 1151. Some walling discovered in the cellars of the current castle may be evidence of a Roman villa, dating from the 1st century BC, on the site.

The castle was restored in the 15th century by Ibleto of Challant. The current appearance developed between 1490 and 1510 under George of Challant, who transformed it into a luxurious residence for his cousin Margaret de La Chambre and her son Philibert. These works transformed Issogne castle into a luxurious Renaissance residence.

After various owners, it was bought by the artist Vittorio Avondo in 1872 who restored it and donated it to the State in 1907. Today the castle belongs to the autonomous Region of Aosta Valley.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cory Hoy (8 months ago)
My phone says I visited today but I was just picking up my daughter from school.. I've been there and I can say it's the best castle in the valley. Cost about 10€ per person.
hike&bike Italy (14 months ago)
One of the most visited Castles in the Valley. A castle and a palace, with colorful frescoes and furniture ( original or replaced but according to the style). Remarkable writings dating back 1700 or 1600 left by the pilgrims. The guided tour (in italian) was really interesting.
hike&bike Italy (14 months ago)
One of the most visited Castles in the Valley. A castle and a palace, with colorful frescoes and furniture ( original or replaced but according to the style). Remarkable writings dating back 1700 or 1600 left by the pilgrims. The guided tour (in italian) was really interesting.
Federico Zambelli (14 months ago)
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Agustin Dal Lago (21 months ago)
The place was very beautiful. However the guided tour was quite disappointing. Not only the guide seemed rushed and spoke very fast (my Italian is basic but enough for basic understanding, my gf is Italian and agreed that she struggled to follow), the people around were disrespectful and would talk on top of her. The guide should politely ask them to shut up and continue presenting her idea, preferably showing interest in her topic.
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