Porta Pretoria

Aosta, Italy

Situated on the eastern section of the walls, Porta Pretoria provided the main access to the city of Augusta Praetoria. It was built in 25 BC after the defeat of the Salassians by Terenzio Varrone. It had three openings, which are still visible today: the central one for carriages and the side openings for pedestrians. The area inside the openings was used as a troop parade court, in its southern section, the land was dug up as far as the level of the ground during the Roman era.

On the outer facing openings you can still see the grooves from where the gates were lowered at night. The eastern facade still has some of the marble slabs that once covered the entire monument, on the inside it consists of blocks of puddingstone. In the Middle Ages there was a chapel dedicated to the Most Blessed Trinity resting against Porta Praetoria (now only an alcove of this remains), for many centuries, the same Porta Praetoria went by its name.

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Founded: 25 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Кирилл Волошин (19 months ago)
worth visiting only if you're in the city ) nice starting of old town's footway
Brendan Quinn (20 months ago)
A beautiful relaxed undiscovered corner of Italy in the shadows of 4 great alpine ranges
Tony Brooks (22 months ago)
A place worth visiting if you are in the area
Kimio Kanasugi (2 years ago)
From here, nice street start. Many shops n restaurant are there. Good shopping for local product.
William Gedye (2 years ago)
Best preserved Roman gateway fully accessable with good information. Great little Roman theatre next door
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