Saint Germain Castle

Montjovet, Italy

Saint Germain castle in Montjovet played an important part in the history of Val d’Aosta. Few traces remain of its original structure and its construction date is not known for certain. At the end of the 13th century, the Savoy became the owners, replacing the Montjovet family. As already happened in Bard, in this case too, the pretext was provided by the abuse of power that Feidino Montjovet acted on villagers and wayfarers. The castle was later sold to the Challant family but returned to the Savoy in 1438, when Amadeus VII installed a garrison there, which remained active until 1661, when it was transferred to the fortress in Bard, leaving Montjovet castle open to decay.

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Montjovet, Italy
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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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www.lovevda.it

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luca Tirnusciolo (11 months ago)
Situato a 656 m s.l.m., a picco sulla gola scavata dalla Dora Baltea, su uno sperone roccioso che in epoca romana venne definito Mons Jovis oggi costeggiato dalla Mongiovetta, tratto della Strada statale 26 della Valle d'Aosta scavato nella roccia, il castello di Saint-Germain è tra i castelli della regione più strategici, insieme al forte di Bard e al Châtel-Argent: la sua posizione permetteva facilmente di controllare e difendere il borgo posto ai piedi del mammellone roccioso e la vallata centrale della Valle d'Aosta. Situato a metà strada tra i comuni di Verrès e Saint-Vincent, in collegamento visivo con la Tour Chenal, il castello di Saint-Germain è raggiungibile solo dal lato nord del promontorio di Montjovet. Oggi è in rovina, e un cancello impedisce l'accesso all'area per pericolo di crolli.
Luca Tirnusciolo (11 months ago)
Located at 656 m asl, overlooking the gorge carved by the Dora Baltea, on a rocky spur that in Roman times was called Mons Jovis today flanked by the Mongiovetta, a stretch of the Valle d'Aosta state road carved into the rock, the castle of Saint -Germain is among the most strategic castles in the region, together with the Bard fort and the Châtel-Argent: its position made it easy to control and defend the village at the foot of the rocky mammellone and the central valley of the Aosta Valley. Located halfway between the municipalities of Verrès and Saint-Vincent, in visual connection with the Tour Chenal, the castle of Saint-Germain can only be reached from the north side of the Montjovet promontory. Today it is in ruins, and a gate prevents access to the area due to the danger of collapsing.
Samuele Ermoli (12 months ago)
Beautiful and imposing castle ruin. Very fascinating to visit, even if at your own risk, it causes collapses as indicated by some signs. It should be enhanced! Now it is totally left to abandonment, after some miserable "securing". It is worth the visit, but maximum attention.
Samuele Ermoli (12 months ago)
Beautiful and imposing castle ruin. Very fascinating to visit, even if at your own risk, it causes collapses as indicated by some signs. It should be enhanced! Now it is totally left to abandonment, after some miserable "securing". It is worth the visit, but maximum attention.
Marco Plata (12 months ago)
Abandoned and ruined castle. Too bad, because it has its own history and it would be interesting to visit it. Sign indicating collapses, but who knows ...
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