Château de Calmont d'Olt

Espalion, France

The Château de Calmont d'Olt is perched atop a basalt dyke. It provides a panoramic view of the Aubrac highlands.

Flint fragments and a polished stone axe are evidence of occupation of the site for 5,000 years. The ministerium Calvomantese was first mentioned in 883, in documents from the Abbey at Conques. It has always had a military significance, commanding the road from Rodez to Aubrac and, more widely, the crossing of the River Lot on the Toulouse-Lyon route. The building of the castle was begun in the 11th century built and continued until the Hundred Years' War with the building of a second curtain with eight towers in 1400. Beyond this date, there was no further development. Abandoned by its owners in the 16th century, the castle fell to ruin. The castle, in its present state, is an important milestone in the history of castle building in medieval Rouergue. It bears witness to the architectural adaptations of castles to the technical progress of the Hundred Years' War.

The castle is part of the Route des Seigneurs du Rouergue (Route of the Lords of Rouergue) which groups 23 castles.

The site highlights the theme of siege warfare. Full-scale war machines have been reconstructed and visitors may assist in the launching of projectiles with. There is a siege tower from the 15th century with bombards, trébuchets from the 14th century and pierrière from the siege of Toulouse from the 13th century. Visitors are also invited to take part in other demonstrations including archery, fencing and making chain mail.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sébastien Esnault (2 years ago)
Super guide, belle ambiance pour l'ouverture de saison. Je recommande. Pour tous publique. Immersion très bien faite et ludique. Merci l'équipe
PATRICK CHASTEL (2 years ago)
En cette saison pas d'animations bien sûr mais les enfants étaient ravis de remplir le questionnaire le long du parcours.
thibault pierre (2 years ago)
Lieux magique... et on se plonge dans l'histoire avec une envie folle !
mederic beugnier (2 years ago)
Dommage qu'il soit fermée une partie de l'année
Xavier Delplanque (3 years ago)
Great for kids (although we missed the show)
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