Detmold Open-air Museum

Detmold, Germany

The Detmold Open-air Museum (LWL-Freilichtmuseum Detmold) was founded, together with the Hagen Open-air Museum, in 1960, and was first opened to the public in the early 1970s. Over 100 historic, rural buildings were transported and reconstructed from across the state, including schools, farmhouses, thatched cottages, and windmills. The large bucolic fields and ponds are available for horse-drawn carriage rides, walking tours, and picnicking. The museum also hosts special exhibitions and interactive craft demonstrations, such as blacksmithing and pottery-making. It is open in summer season.

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Details

Founded: 1960
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

More Information

www.lwl.org
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Анжела Търтова (16 months ago)
A well-restored and well-maintained place full of history. It was extremely interesting to see how people lived a few centuries ago.
Saartje Camino (17 months ago)
Great day out for the whole family!
Russell Lewis (19 months ago)
A great outdoor museum filled with buildings dating back to the 15th century. Friendly and interesting (and interested) staff made this an unexpected delight.
Johannes Curran (2 years ago)
Nice for all ages and families. You can go on the carriage or take a nice short walk up. At the other side of the museum there is a nice view from a wooden tower (see picture).
Stephanie Friesen (2 years ago)
A wonderful museum. The idea of the museum is one of the most creative ones. It simulates the life that people had at smaller villages years ago. From people's bed to what they used to cook, from how they worked to how they had fun, the experience is unique and unforgettable. There is a path to follow but you can also move freely, the place is big and beautiful. It is perfect for photographers or simply people who enjoy being close to nature. Perfect for going there with family and friends.
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