The German Tank Museum is an armoured fighting vehicle museum in Munster, Germany, the location of the Munster Training Area camp (not to be confused with the city of Münster). Its main aim is the documentation of the history of German armoured troops since 1917.

The museum displays tanks, military vehicles, weapons, small arms, uniforms, medals, decorations and military equipment from World War I to the present day. The heart of the exhibition is a collection of about 40 Bundeswehr and former East German (Nationale Volksarmee) tanks as well as 40 German tanks and other Wehrmacht vehicles from the Second World War. In addition there are tanks from the Soviet Red Army, the British Army and the United States Army from the Second World War, as well as other modern tanks such as the Israeli Merkava. Most of the vehicles are in working order, with restoration work ongoing to render all examples functional.

The museum site covers an area of over 9,000 square metres.  In 2003 the museum opened a new building for special displays, a museum shop and a cafeteria.

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Details

Founded: 1983
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stijn Lenaerts (3 months ago)
Interesting collection of tanks and military vehicles. The museum is well laid out and covers multiple areas in armored warfare. As a 'bonus' during our visit we had a constant artillery soundtrack in the background coming from nearby military manoeuvres. LPT: Take a jacket, the halls are not heated!
Widi Widiantoro (4 months ago)
Great places to wander around and marvel at many historic tanks and armored vehicles. That said, it's slightly dusty
Johnny Dark (4 months ago)
Better than expected. I didn't allow enough time and I didn't get to properly enjoy it all. Great museum.
Michael Burton (5 months ago)
A great selection of vehicles. Many interesting facts. Great for the kids too
pf4d (8 months ago)
Being a modeler of plastic armored fighting vehicles, visiting this museum was a life-long dream come true for me. So many tanks. I wish I had arrived earlier in the day, there is a lot to see. Well maintained and beautiful collection, including interior cutaways, tanks you can go inside, and all kinds of uniforms, historical information, and data. BVerwG The paint on the WWII vehicles is stunning. Seriously, you have to go here.
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