Church of John the Baptist

Lüneburg, Germany

The Church of John the Baptist (Johanniskirche) is the oldest Lutheran church in Lüneburg, Germany. The church is considered an important example of northern German Brick Gothic architecture. The five-naved hall church was erected between 1300 and 1370 and repaired in 1420. In the early 15th century Conrad of Soltau, as Conrad III Prince-Bishop of Verden, failed to make St. John's the new cathedral of his see, since the city council and the Prince of Lüneburg resisted that fearing the political interference of another power. The outer structure was marked by rebuilding in 1765. Particularly striking is the lightly sloping steeple, which at a height of 108 meters is the highest church steeple in Lower Saxony. The stained-glass in the Elisabeth Chapel was made by Charles Crodel in 1969.

The church's organ was finished in 1553 by Hendrik Niehoff and Jasper Johansen and rebuilt in 1714 by Arp Schnitger student, Matthias Dropa and in the latter 20th century by Rudolf von Beckerath.

The 108-meter-high spire of the church looks as though it is sloping from each side: the truss on the upper part is twisted into a corkscrew shape. A legend states that when the master builder noticed the mistake, he fell from an upper window in the church tower; however, he landed on a passing haywagon, so he lived. Feeling that he had been vindicated by God, the master went into a local tavern to celebrate. After a few too many drinks he leaned back in his chair and fell over. As he fell he hit his head on the stone hearth of the fireplace and was killed.

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Details

Founded: 1300-1370
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Annika Täubler (2 years ago)
Ein großes altes Stück Geschichte. Wer als Besucher genau hin sieht merkt das sie schief ist. Dahinter steht eine Geschichte. Man sollte die Kirche am besten morgens besuchen,dann hört man aus dem Kirchturm unseren Stadt bekannten Musiker der jeden morgen (bis auf Sonntag) mit seiner Musik die Anwohner begrüßt
Alex (2 years ago)
Quintessential German town
Indranil Sinha (2 years ago)
পরেরদিন আকাশ পরিষ্কার থাকায় আমরা গেলাম কাছাকাছি একটা পুরোনো শহর Lüneburg এ। এই শহরটি ১০০০ বছরেরও বেশী পুরোনো, নুন তৈরীর জন্য বিখ্যাত ও উত্তর জার্মানীর সুন্দরতম শহরগুলির মধ্যে একটি। দ্বিতীয় বিশ্বযুদ্ধেও কোনো ক্ষতি না হবার ফলে Lüneburg তার কমনীয় মধ্যযুগীয় চরিত্রটি বজায় রেখেছে। Ilmenau নদীর ধারে অবস্থিত এই শহরটি। নদীর ধারে গাড়ী পার্ক করে আমরা শহরে হাঁটতে বেরোলাম। পুরোনো বাড়ী, পাথরের রাস্তা, সুন্দর সব বাড়ীর ডিজাইন, প্রচুর ট্যুরিস্ট, শহরের মধ্যিখানে গাড়ী চলা বারণ, খালি পাবলিক বাস চলে, প্রচুর ওপেন এয়ার রেস্তোরাঁ, সেখানে লোকজন বসে পানাহার করছে, ঝকঝকে নীল আকাশ, সব মিলিয়ে একটা দারুন পরিবেশ। আমরা দেখলাম St. Johanniskirche (st. Johannis church), টাউন হল, ওয়াটার টাওয়ার এবং St. Nicolai church. Lüneburg এর চেয়ে ভালো জায়গা দিয়ে বোধহয় আমাদের জার্মানী ভ্রমণ সম্পন্ন হতে পারতো না। অথচ এখানে আসার কোনো পরিকল্পনাই আমাদের ছিল না। আমাদের হোস্ট এই জায়গাটার উল্লেখ করে বলেছিলেন : "this is a must see ".
Aidin Azimi (3 years ago)
Nice and calm. Old style and beautiful.
Thoralf Bock (8 years ago)
Wow!
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