Villa Widmann

Mira, Italy

The Villa Widmann-Foscari is located at the shores of the river Brenta located in the small town of Mira, between Venice and Padua. The present palace was built in the 18th century; a succession of families including the Scerimann, Donà, Foscari, had previously owned the site. The present villa was apparently designed and built in 1719 by Alessandro Tirali, a Venetian architect.

The Widmanns commissioned the internal frescoes mainly by Giuseppe Angeli, a pupil of Giambattista Piazzetta, and Gerolamo Mengozzi Colonna, who worked with Tiepolo. The Villa is surrounded by cypress and horse-chestnut trees, and gardens interspersed by several stone statues of gods, nymphs and cupids. A Barchessa (a protruding arcade wing usually functioning as storage sheds or stables) and a small church, where Elisabetta and Arianna Widmann are buried, are also part of the Villa’s buildings.

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Address

Via Nazionale 421, Mira, Italy
See all sites in Mira

Details

Founded: 1719
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Donato Palombo (19 months ago)
Sono andato a visitare la villa in occasione di una rappresentazione per bambini della Bella e la Bestia che si svolgeva all'interno. Gioiello tra i gioielli architettonici costruiti dai nobili veneziani per la loro villeggiatura che hanno reso famosa questa verde località, Villa Widmann Rezzonico Foscari è uno splendido esempio di Villa in stile rococò di gusto francese in posizione strategica quasi a metà strada tra Venezia e Padova. Il complesso è formato dalla Casa dominicale aperta per visite turistiche, servizi fotografici, esposizioni e mostre, dalla Barchessa e dalle Serre che offrono spazi polifunzionali per attività business & leisure, dall’Oratorio, dal Giardino storico e dal Parco monumentale.
Ward Ward (2 years ago)
The Villa across the road sold as a combined ticket is the star and A five star attraction
Michela Bedognetti (2 years ago)
Belliasima
Jacquie Hudson (2 years ago)
Lovely villa with interesting art and frescoes, murano glass lights. The garden is in need of some attention though....
Claudia Schiavon (3 years ago)
It's a charming villa full of history and art
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