Villa Giovanelli Colonna

Noventa Padovana, Italy

The Villa Giovannelli Colonna is a rural palace which was commissioned in the late 17th century by the Giovanelli family to the architect Antonio Gaspari.

In 1738 Andrea Giovanelli and his brother Benedetto decorated the facade of the Villa with the festive Pronaos and a precious entrance stairway by Giorgio Massari. On the balustrades are six allegorical statues representing the five senses: the Belvedere (sight/male), Il Odorato (smell/male), Il Tatto (touch/female), L'Udire (hearing/female), Il Gusto (taste/female) which are observed by La Ragione. They were executed by Antonio Tarsia, Antonio Gai and by the brothers Paolo and Giuseppe Groppelli.

The interior is frescoed by Sebastiano Ricci and Giuseppe Angeli, who also did the frescos in Villa Widmann-Foscari. The frescos were changed when Federico Giovanelli, Patriarch of Venice, took over the villa. His brothers Giovanni Benedetto and Giovanni Paolo Giovannelli commissioned two large canvases by Luca Carlevarijs. The gardens consist of labyrinths and designs.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

User Reviews

Rigo Giancarlo (3 years ago)
La villa è restauro si spera in un domani per delle visite
Pierandrea Squarcina (3 years ago)
Uno schifo è dei preti comunisti !
Andrea Zerbetto (3 years ago)
River of brenta all villa is particolary and beautifull
Lucio Reffo (4 years ago)
Bella e fortunatamente in fase di restauro speriamo si possa anche visitare dall'interno.
Nina Wawryszuk (4 years ago)
Beautiful view while other trips.
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