Bilstein castle is located on a spur which falls away steeply on three sides so that the castle's defences only needed to be oriented towards the hill to the northeast. The appearance of the castle is thus dominated by its two round towers, each with a diameter of about eight metres: the Chapel Tower in the northwest and the Hohnekamp Tower in the southeast. The towers are connected by a tunnel under the castle courtyard, above ground is a 20th century archway.

The castle was built between 1202-1225. The Electorate of Cologne conquered it after a siege in 1445. Later it has been used for administrative purposes.

The northwestern wing of the main ward and the central block in the southwest are historical structures. By contrast, the wing in the southeast was built in 1978 to expand the hostel. On the valley side of the central block is a portal terrace (Söller) on which a prominent lime tree is growing.

Today a brick bridge spans the moat between the inner and outer baileys. The moat has been partly filled-in and is about 15 metres wide. The outer bailey comprises three buildings, which are referred to as the gatehouse, timber-framed house and festival hall.

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Details

Founded: 1202-1225
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrian Khidi (2 years ago)
Hat spass gemacht dort. Zimmer waren gut und das Essen auch.
Iris van der Meer (2 years ago)
Eine schöne Jugendherberge. Tolles Personal, super Service.
Judidit Bingbadabum (2 years ago)
Es ist eine Jugendherberge also darf man nicht zu viel erwarten... die 4 Mann Räume waren sehr klein und leider war mir das ganze Wochenende dort kalt also dicke Socken einpacken und auf Sonderwünsche beim Essen (auf vorherige mehrfache Anfrage) wird dort nur ungern eingegangen. Eine Dame aus der Küche war zu zwei Freunden außerdem wiederholt sehr unhöflich und schlecht gelaunt. Erlebe sowas leider immer wieder in DJH aber muss das sein? Ansonsten ist die Burg mal was außergewöhnliches...
Ton Constant (2 years ago)
Gezellige omgeving we een zware klom via de trappen.
Radames della Putta (2 years ago)
Sehr schön. Zum Wandern in der Umgebung der perfekte Startpunkt.
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