Malia Minoan Palace

Malia, Greece

To the east of the modern resort is the Minoan Palace of Malia. This is the third-largest Minoan palace in Crete, built in a wonderful setting near the sea, on the road linking eastern and central Crete.

This palace - the seat, according to myth, of Minos’ brother Sarpedon - was first constructed circa 1900 BC. The already large settlement, some parts of which are preserved around the palace, thus became a palace-city. This first palace was destroyed c. 1700 BC and rebuilt in c. 1650 BC on the same site and with the same layout. Finally the new palace was destroyed in c. 1450 BC and not reoccupied. During the Mycenean period a small building, probably a sanctuary, was constructed in the ruins.

At Malia we can actually walk around the actual palace, just as it was uncovered by archaeological excavations. Most of the ruins visible today belong to the Neopalatial complex - the second palace - whose rooms are set around three courts: the Central Court, the North Court and the Tower Court. The majestic size, complex plan and multiple details of the palace make it a fascinating place to visit.

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Details

Founded: 1900 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

More Information

www.explorecrete.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ann (9 months ago)
Interesting, but would have been more interesting with more information on what we were looking at.
Bjent van der Enden (9 months ago)
Very interesting archeological site. Some parts have been minimally reconstructed. Just enough to understand the constructions. Over 3000 years old...
David Hayhow (10 months ago)
Interesting place with some details of the people who made the technology work.
Jess Citrus (10 months ago)
Stunning remains of a minoan castle, I'd love to see when it's fully excavated
Vasile Iuga (2 years ago)
No guide..not enough plates information
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