Toplou Monastery

Sitia, Greece

Toplou monastery is one of the most significant monasteries in Crete, dedicated to Virgin Mary and St. John the Theologian. It was founded around the mid-15th century, probably on the ruins of an earlier convent. The monastery was plundered by the knights of Malta in 1530 and shattered in 1612 by a strong earthquake. Due to its strategic position, the senate of the Republic of Venice, then ruler of Crete, decided to financially aid in rebuilding it. The monastery flourished until the surrender of eastern Crete to the Turks in 1646, after which it was abandoned for a long time. In 1704, it acquired special protection privileges from the Patriarch and was re-inhabited.

After its monks were slaughtered by Turks in 1821 during the Greek Revolution of Independence, Toplou was again deserted until 1828. In 1866, during the massive Cretan revolt against the Turks, it was once again devastated. During the German occupation of 1941-44, Toplou was providing shelter to resistance fighters and housed their wireless radio. When this was discovered by the Germans, the abbot and two monks were tortured and executed.

Having to defend itself from pirates and invaders, Toplou monastery is heavily fortified, being laid out around a courtyard paved with sea pebbles and surrounded by strong, 10 m high square walls. In its present form it extends to about 800 square meters in three floors, divided into cells, guest houses, kitchens and warehouses. The main church (katholikon) is built as a two-nave basilica and the belltower dates back to 1558.

Despite its turbulent history, Toplou has many works of art to its possession. Today, it hosts an interesting exhibition of Byzantine icons, books and documents, a display of ancient engravings and a collection of artefacts which reflect its role in the historical events that influenced Crete during the last centuries. The monastery possesses a series of about 20 portraits of monks, despotes and igoumens painted by the famous portraitist Thomas Papadoperakis. Many of them have written the recent tragical history of the place. The walls of the monks' dining hall, the 'trapezaria', are also adorned with remarkable fresco paintings by the icon painter Manolis Betinakis.

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Details

Founded: c. 1450
Category: Religious sites in Greece

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Boriss B (19 months ago)
Nice place to visit.
Paula Pattakou (20 months ago)
Beautiful monastery with a great history. Also has a small museum.
John Niotis (20 months ago)
One of most famous places to visit around this area. Perfect place for day trip with Friends and family. The place is quiet full with fresh air.
Yew Geni (2 years ago)
Absolutely waste of money. You pay 3 € basically for nothing. You can see the inner ground floor and some old drawings. That's it. Save your time and don't go here.
Kasper Davidsen (2 years ago)
A fine little monastery to visit if you are in the area, but I wouldn't drive far and wide for it. The entrance fee of 3€ is alright considering that there is also a museum, but there is not a whole lot to see. The buildings themselves are very well kept and worth a picture, but keep in mind that you cannot photograph the church or the museum. Also remember to wear decent clothes with no bare shoulders.
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