Saint-Hubert Abbey Church

Saint-Hubert, Belgium

The Abbey of Saint-Hubert, officially the Abbey of St Peter in the Ardennes, was a Benedictine monastery founded in the Ardennes in 687 and suppressed in 1797. The former abbey church is now a minor basilica in the diocese of Namur.

The monastery was founded in the village of Andage in 687 by Pepin of Herstal and his wife, Plectrude, for the monk Bergis. The remains of St Hubert (died 727) were installed in the monastery on 30 September 825. There were serious fires in the monastery in 1130, 1261, and 1525, and the building was sacked by Calvinists in 1568. The final suppression of the monastery took place in 1797.

The baroque facade strongly contrasts with its slender Gothic interior which is all light and colours. Descriptive booklet is available in English. Guided visits for groups on request (French, Dutch, German, English).

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Details

Founded: 687 AD
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

san san (5 years ago)
Amazing ... to see what is inside.
Paul V Summeren (5 years ago)
Mooie basiliek om te zien met daarnaast nog een mooi gebouw als men in de buurt is is het leuk om daar is te gaan kijken
Marc Ridders (5 years ago)
Be sure to visit the crypt.
David Turner (6 years ago)
A church worth visiting but not a Sunday
Bastiaan Notebaert (8 years ago)
Worth a stop if you pass by St hubert
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