Farnsburg Castle Ruins

Ormalingen, Switzerland

Farnsburg  castle ruins are the remains from the 14th century. It was built by the Counts of Thierstein between 1319-1342. In the 15th century Farnsburg lost its military purpose. The buildings were left to decay and it was easily conquered in 1653 (the Peasants' War) and finally in 1798 (by the revolting farmers). In 1798 the city Vogt was finally expelled and the castle was set on fire by landowners. The ruin was then used as a quarry.

A good starting point for a hike to the ruins is the Landgasthof Farnsburg - from here it is 20 minutes walk to the ruins. There are also BBQ and picnic facilities in close proximity to the ancient ruins.

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Details

Founded: 1319-1342
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Althaus (Armandir) (6 days ago)
Under renovation on July 31st, so not everything is accessible yet. A large part can still be visited via specially built footbridges. The view is great and the ruins are worth a visit.
This and That (2 months ago)
Still under renovation. Still could enjoy the view. ? Climbing up is tough, but worth it.
Alexandra briner (4 months ago)
Very impressive despite the construction site. Great view ?
Yannick Eiger (10 months ago)
Very nice view in the evening, a 15-minute walk is worth it
Manizon BS (13 months ago)
Sehr Cool auf der grossen Schild Mauer zu stehen!
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