Dome of the Rock

Jerusalem, Israel

The Dome of the Rock is an Islamic shrine located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. It was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna, built on the site of the Roman temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, which had in turn been built on the site of the Second Jewish Temple, destroyed during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE. The original dome collapsed in 1015 and was rebuilt in 1022–23. The Dome of the Rock is in its core one of the oldest extant works of Islamic architecture.

Its architecture and mosaics were patterned after nearby Byzantine churches and palaces, although its outside appearance has been significantly changed in the Ottoman period and again in the modern period, notably with the addition of the gold-plated roof, in 1959–61 and again in 1993. The octagonal plan of the structure may also have been influenced by the Byzantine Church of the Seat of Mary (also known as Kathisma in Greek and al-Qadismu in Arabic) built between 451 and 458 on the road between Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

The site's great significance for Muslims derives from traditions connecting it to the creation of the world and to the belief that the Prophet Muhammad's Night Journey to heaven started from the rock at the center of the structure. The rock also bears great significance for Jews as the purported site of Abraham's attempted sacrifice of his son.

It has been called Jerusalem's most recognizable landmark, and it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with two nearby Temple Mount structures, the Western Wall, and the 'Resurrection Rotunda' in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

 

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Details

Founded: 691 CE
Category: Religious sites in Israel

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lora Walsh (18 months ago)
Stunning. We went at 715 am in the morning to beat the crowds. We were the first ones in and it was definitely worth getting up early to experience this site with some serenity.
Lindo Korchi - Content Creator (18 months ago)
I remember looking at the Dome and wondering how it was even constructed. It must've taken so long to build. It looks absolutely amazing, and bigger in real life.
EXTRANJERIA CALDERA (18 months ago)
Amazing mosque in Middle East, one of most important in the World... Its so impressive to be there.....
Irma A (18 months ago)
Beautiful and very religious... Please take care the most historical place for our children..
Lu Xia (19 months ago)
Beautiful building with such historical, religious, and geopolitical significance. Just wish we could go in. Only Muslims are allowed to enter right now. We respect that but are still curious to see the inside.
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