Dome of the Rock

Jerusalem, Israel

The Dome of the Rock is an Islamic shrine located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. It was initially completed in 691 CE at the order of Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Malik during the Second Fitna, built on the site of the Roman temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, which had in turn been built on the site of the Second Jewish Temple, destroyed during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE. The original dome collapsed in 1015 and was rebuilt in 1022–23. The Dome of the Rock is in its core one of the oldest extant works of Islamic architecture.

Its architecture and mosaics were patterned after nearby Byzantine churches and palaces, although its outside appearance has been significantly changed in the Ottoman period and again in the modern period, notably with the addition of the gold-plated roof, in 1959–61 and again in 1993. The octagonal plan of the structure may also have been influenced by the Byzantine Church of the Seat of Mary (also known as Kathisma in Greek and al-Qadismu in Arabic) built between 451 and 458 on the road between Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

The site's great significance for Muslims derives from traditions connecting it to the creation of the world and to the belief that the Prophet Muhammad's Night Journey to heaven started from the rock at the center of the structure. The rock also bears great significance for Jews as the purported site of Abraham's attempted sacrifice of his son.

It has been called Jerusalem's most recognizable landmark, and it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with two nearby Temple Mount structures, the Western Wall, and the 'Resurrection Rotunda' in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

 

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Details

Founded: 691 CE
Category: Religious sites in Israel

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Avi Schuss (2 months ago)
I was very unimpressed with the atmosphere I heard so much about it and the people there were filled with such a negative attitude. Do not recommend!!
Muhammad Omar Faruk (5 months ago)
The first qibla of Muslim Ummah.
emre korkmaz (5 months ago)
Dazzling
Mawada bakri (5 months ago)
The most peacful place in the world
Yves Jilani (5 months ago)
One of the most beautiful Islamic shrines, beautifully built and preserved, dress appropriately if visiting!
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The castle first mentioned in 1200 was originally owned by the King and later, at the end of the 13th century it fell in hands of Matúš Èák. Its owners alternated - at the end of the 14th century the family of Stibor of Stiborice bought it.

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Another legend has it that the lord of the castle had his servant thrown down from the rock because he protected his child from the lords favourite dog. Before his death, the servant pronounced a curse saying that they would meet in a year and days time, and indeed precisely after that time the lord was bitten by a snake and fell down to the same abyss.

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