Calvi Citadel

Calvi, France

The Genoese Citadel is the main part of the town of Calvi, and its most important historical monument. It was a military outpost in the 15th century that helped guard the city against attacks from Franco-Turkish raiders to Anglo-Corsican armies. Inside the battlements, don’t miss the well-proportioned Caserne Sampiero, a military barracks that once served as the Genoese administration's seat of power, and the 13th-century Cathédrale St-Jean Baptiste, whose most celebrated relic is the ebony Christ des Miracles, credited with saving Calvi from Saracen invasion in 1553.

The citadel sits high above Calvi port from where it towers over the sea. From up here you get some great views of the coast and harbour.

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Address

Carrughju Agnese, Calvi, France
See all sites in Calvi

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tmade (2 years ago)
Beautyful, but built with blood!
Lenka Hrubá (2 years ago)
Nice old part of the city with little streets, just didn't like that streets full of rubish souvenirs under the Citadele
Jack Saebyeog-Sun (2 years ago)
Calvi is known for its beaches and crescent-shaped bay. A medieval citadel overlooks the marina from the bay's western end, and is home to Baroque St-Jean-Baptiste Cathedral and cobbled streets. Restaurants line the harbor on the Quai Landry esplanade. Perched on a high hill a short distance inland, the chapel of Notre-Dame de la Serra has panoramic views of the area.
Konstantin Mirny (3 years ago)
The old citadel with many small tourist shops and restaurants. Nice view to the city and Porto. The most interesting places are marked with a sequence numbers. The entrance with car only with a special permit. There is a huge parking in the city near the entrance. The price in shops is definitely higher as usual.
Niklas Thulin (3 years ago)
Fantastic place. Very nice view over all of Calvi. Did you know that Marco Polo was born in Calvi? He was not from Genoa as many stories goes and are told. He was born here.. Most parts of the Castle (Citadelle) is being renovated so some parts might be difficult to approach. Nice afternoon outing.
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