Magalia Castle-palace is highlighted by its fortifications, crowned by two large defence towers, while inside is like a refined renaissance residential Palace for accommodation and leisure.

Located in a privileged and natural geographic enclave, its installations are adapted to today’s needs to make it the ideal place to combine work and relaxation, with all the comforts of a modern hotel and the charm of a mansion. Built in the 16th century, with the outside appearance of a castle and the refined interior of a renaissance palace, the building was declared a Historic-Artistic Monument in 1931.

The main facade is a preview to the peace that radiates inside, with its four main balconies, its renaissance windows and the arched front door, which leads onto a spacious hallway with majestic stone steps.

Built in 1533 by the first Marquises of Las Navas, the history of the Magalia Castle Palace is closely linked to this marquisate. Sixteen marquises made pacts and alliances with other nobles throughout history, to transform and enhance the Castle Palace, which at the beginning of the 18th century united the family through marriage with the Duchy of Medinaceli. In 1906, it was sold to the company Unión Resinera Española, and in 1946 it was donated to the Female Section, who converted it into a teacher training college. Finally, in 1976, after the disappearance of the Secretariat General of the Movement, it was transferred to the Ministry of Culture.

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Founded: 1533
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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magalia.mcu.es

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marisa Azañedo (2 years ago)
Un lugar totalmente fantástico por su naturaleza histórica, digno de visitar y aprender su mitología
Nuria Segovia (2 years ago)
Un sitio mágico. Para retroceder en el tiempo. No se puede ir a las Navas y no visitar su espléndido castillo. Bien conservado.
Stefan Andrei (3 years ago)
Beautiful place in a quiet little pueblo in thr mountains
libroescolar. es (4 years ago)
Beautiful
Gregorio Diaz-Descalzo (4 years ago)
Wanna feel in the medieval ages?
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Château de Falaise

Château de Falaise is best known as a castle, where William the Conqueror, the son of Duke Robert of Normandy, was born in about 1028. William went on to conquer England and become king and possession of the castle descended through his heirs until the 13th century when it was captured by King Philip II of France. Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840 it has been protected as a monument historique.

The castle (12th–13th century), which overlooks the town from a high crag, was formerly the seat of the Dukes of Normandy. The construction was started on the site of an earlier castle in 1123 by Henry I of England, with the 'large keep' (grand donjon). Later was added the 'small keep' (petit donjon). The tower built in the first quarter of the 12th century contained a hall, chapel, and a room for the lord, but no small rooms for a complicated household arrangement; in this way, it was similar to towers at Corfe, Norwich, and Portchester, all in England. In 1202 Arthur I, Duke of Brittany was King John of England's nephew, was imprisoned in Falaise castle's keep. According to contemporaneous chronicler Ralph of Coggeshall, John ordered two of his servants to mutilate the duke. Hugh de Burgh was in charge of guarding Arthur and refused to let him be mutilated, but to demoralise Arthur's supporters was to announce his death. The circumstances of Arthur's death are unclear, though he probably died in 1203.

In about 1207, after having conquered Normandy, Philip II Augustus ordered the building of a new cylindrical keep. It was later named the Talbot Tower (Tour Talbot) after the English commander responsible for its repair during the Hundred Years' War. It is a tall round tower, similar design to the towers built at Gisors and the medieval Louvre.Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840, Château de Falaise has been recognised as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

A programme of restoration was carried out between 1870 and 1874. The castle suffered due to bombardment during the Second World War in the battle for the Falaise pocket in 1944, but the three keeps were unscathed.