Ávila Cathedral

Ávila, Spain

The Cathedral of Ávila has Romanesque and Gothic architectural traditions. It was planned as a cathedral-fortress, its apse being one of the turrets of the city walls. It is surrounded by a number of houses or palaces.

It is not known exactly when the construction of the Cathedral began, there being two theories. One states that Alvar García started its construction in 1091 inside the remains of the Church of the Saviour, which was in ruins as a result of successive Muslim attacks, and that Alfonso VI of Castile raised the money necessary to build it. Other historians believe the Cathedral to be the work of the maestro Fruchel in the 12th century coinciding with the repopulation of Castille led by Raymond of Burgundy.

Of the 13th century are the first stages of the towers and aisles and of the 14th century the second stage of the towers, the cloister, the vaults and the flying buttresses. Already in the 15th century the cathedral was complete and in 1475 Juan Guas built the mechanical clock.

The Cathedral of Ávila is considered by its age (12th century), along with the Cathedral of Cuenca, as the first two Gothic cathedrals in Spain. It shows French influences and great resemblances to the Abbey Church of St Denis, the first European Gothic church.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1091
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David L. Brooks (9 months ago)
A wonderful cathedral that inspires one's imagination.
Laura Hale (10 months ago)
Really enjoyed myself. Staff were super kind in letting me store my luggage after I got caught out not realizing my hotel wasn't doing luggage storage because of Covid-19. Bottle fed infant inside cathedral and zero issues either . Audio tour is on mobile phone. Handy but bring your own headphones. €6 admission feels reasonable if you're paying to see it, especially as there is a museum attached.
Martin V Mathew (15 months ago)
I love the beautiful Cathedral. It's very renowned for its wonderful and unique art works.. The entrance pass includes also the visit to the Cathedral museum, a home for magnificent paintings of the middle ages..
Nami Haghighi (17 months ago)
Straight out of history books. One if the best preserved fortified cities I have had the pleasure of visiting. The cathedral was closed as I was there in the evening but around every corner there was a beautiful building to see and photograph. One if my favourite cities in my tours around Spain over the years. Well worth a visit.
andy ford (2 years ago)
Fantastic cathedral. The audio tour wants around an hour to an hour and a half to do properly. Although it's a popular tourist destination there is still a good prayerful atmosphere. Well worth the visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Angelokastro

Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

The exact period of the building of the castle is not known, but it has often been attributed to the reigns of Michael I Komnenos and his son Michael II Komnenos. The first documentary evidence for the fortress dates to 1272, when Giordano di San Felice took possession of it for Charles of Anjou, who had seized Corfu from Manfred, King of Sicily in 1267.

From 1387 to the end of the 16th century, Angelokastro was the official capital of Corfu and the seat of the Provveditore Generale del Levante, governor of the Ionian islands and commander of the Venetian fleet, which was stationed in Corfu.

The governor of the castle (the castellan) was normally appointed by the City council of Corfu and was chosen amongst the noblemen of the island.

Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.