Segovia Cathedral

Segovia, Spain

Begun in 1525, the construction of Segovia Cathedral was ordered by Charles V to replace an earlier cathedral near the Alcázar, which had been destroyed during the War of the Comuneros, a revolt against that king.

The designs for the cathedral were drawn up by the leading late-Gothicist Juan Gil de Hontañón but executed by his son Rodrigo, in whose work can be seen a transition from the Gothic to the Renaissance style. The cathedral was finally completed in 1768 and consecrated on July 16 of that year.

The building's structure features three tall vaults and an ambulatory, with fine tracery windows and numerous stained glass windows. The interior is characterized by unity of style (late Gothic), except for the dome, built around 1630 by Pedro de Brizuela. The Gothic vaults are 33 meters high by 50 meters wide and 105 long. The bell tower reaches almost 90 meters. The current stone spire crowning the tower, dating from 1614, was erected after a major fire caused by a thunderstorm. The original spire, entirely Gothic, was built of American mahogany, had a pyramidal structure, and was the tallest tower in Spain.

Entrance is through the north transept. The interior, illuminated by 16th-century Flemish windows, is light, bare and uncluttered, with a large Gothic choir (15th-century, predating the cathedral) placed in the center. Across from the choir in the east end is the high altar, with an 18th-century altarpiece by Sabatini.

The walls and apse are lined with more than 20 chapels. The third chapel on your right from the entrance has a lamentation group in wood by the 17th-century Baroque sculptor Gregorio Fernández.

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Details

Founded: 1525-1577
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tory Lipsey (15 months ago)
Spectacular and stunning stained glass. Massive arches that rival must cathedrals I have seen. A must visit.
Jana Statute (15 months ago)
This magnificent building impressed us more than the Royal Palace in Madrid. Same exposure of gold and wealth but more tasteful. And it costs less to visit
Alistair Vaz (15 months ago)
Exquisite Gothic Cathedral, with a delightful courtyard, tower and gallery. A must see in Segovia, and do give yourself at least 1.5hrs to take it all in. The largest Gothic cathedral in the world.
Filip Van Bouwel (15 months ago)
Very pretty cathedral. The tower and the views from the top of it, are reason enough to visit it. Definitely one of the prettiest cathedrals from our trip. The only huge downside is the amount of tourists. It was so crowded it just got annoying after a while. Going up the tower took forever and felt like being stuck in a traffic jam. They should really limit the amount of people per day
Brandy Nicole (17 months ago)
I’ll be honest... I didn’t go inside this cathedral but I give it a solid 5 stars for how beautiful the exterior is! There is a plaza right next to it with dining options that include outside seating. Perfect opportunity to enjoy the beauty of this architecture and some good food!
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