Real Fábrica de Cristales

Segovia, Spain

Real Fábrica de Cristales de La Granja ('Royal Factory of Glass and Crystal of La Granja') was a Spanish royal manufacturing factory established in 1727 by Philip V of Spain. In that year, funded by the crown, the Catalan artisan Buenaventura Sit installed a small oven which manufactured float glass for the windows and mirrors of the Royal Palace of La Granja de San Ildefonso, which was under construction in the 1720s. Sit had previously worked at Nuevo Baztan where a glass factory failed because of inadequate fuel supplies. At La Granja there was an abundant supply of wood for the factory in the Sierra de Guadarrama.

Bartolome Sureda y Miserol, previously director of the Real Fabrica de Porcelana del Buen Retiro, the Real Fabrica de Pano in Guadalajara, and the Real Fabrica de Loza de la Moncloa, became director of the Real Fábrica de Cristales de La Granja in 1822. Glass blowing and glassware production could be viewed at the factory. The wares of the royal factory were exported to the Americas, which caused financial losses to the other countries who exported as well. By 1836, with the royal factory experiencing financial hardship, the Royal Treasury formally took over the facility which, unlike other royal factories, failed to financially support itself.

To revive the traditions of the Royal Glass Factory, the National Glass Centre Foundation was established in 1982 in the eighteenth-century building.

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Details

Founded: 1727
Category: Industrial sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

María Ángeles gibaja (17 months ago)
Edificio histórico con unas exposiciones que merece la pena visitar.
ANA ISABEL Muga (18 months ago)
¡¡Que Frío dentro!! Fui con mi hija de 6 años y le encantó. Hicimos visita guiada. Estuvo bien. Pero pase realmente mucho frío!! Deberían de advertirlo.Pena que ya no se lleve la decoración de vidrios a nivel comercial.lo peor, que ahora estoy con GRIPE en la cama. Seguro que me enfríe alli
jesus cid (19 months ago)
La exposición del museo esta bien, pero es una pena como esta acondicionado, si tienes pensado hacer la visita en un día de frío mejor olvida el plan. El frío es horrible y no se puede disfrutar del museo. Una pena
Delia RD (20 months ago)
Sin ser conocedora del mundo del cristal, he salido encantada del museo y con nuevos conocimientos. Además agradezco a la persona que este sábado estaba en el Horno, la gran simpatía y paciencia que ha mostrado con mi hija de 6 años.
Jesus Diaz-Ufano Gordon (2 years ago)
Una visita muy interesante. Un viaje por la historia a través de la evolución del vidrio. Las salas de exposiciones son amplias, luminosas, con gran cantidad de piezas para ver y con una explicación muy detallada. El horno digno de ver, la manera de soplar, manejar y dar forma al vidrio para ver las piezas finalizadas es maravilloso, los niños salen encantados. Los empleados muy amables, simpáticos y muy profesionales.
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