San Ginés Church

Madrid, Spain

The church of San Ginés is one of the oldest churches in Madrid. It was one of the churches of the medieval Madrid, of Mozarab origin, from between the 12th and 13th centuries, and its name comes from the fact that it was dedicated to the patron saint of notaries and secretaries, Saint Genesius of Arles (San Ginés de Arlés). it was rebuilt in 1645.

The church is preceded by an atrium enclosed by railings. It has a Latin cross plan, with a nave and two aisles separated by semicircular arches and several side chapels and the altarpieces belong to the Neoclassical-Romantic school. It was, however, totally reconstructed after suffering several fires, so few remnants of the original church, such as the bell-tower, remain. In 1870, the loggia and atrium facing the Calle Arenal were added.

One of the most curious items on display is a stuffed crocodile, which is said to have been brought over from the Americas during the reign of the Catholic Monarchs.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jack P. (2 years ago)
Beautiful oasis on a crowded commercial street. Classic Romanesque architecture.
Timothy Choi (2 years ago)
Cool spot to explore and def go on weekends as some truly talented street music performances during the afternoon
Bartosz Lipiec (2 years ago)
Just another church. Surrounded by shops on a very crowded street. Few beggars right behind the gate. It was closed from entrance.
Judith Farrero i Fargues (2 years ago)
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Henrique Barbosa (2 years ago)
Small church, beautifully illuminated on the outside.
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