The history of the of Lomnitz (Lomnica) estate goes far back into the Middle Ages, and in the course of centuries they changed owners several times. Between 1835 and 1945 the property belonged to the von Küster family, after World War II the Castle was seized and the Polish state became the new owner. After the fall of the Iron Curtain the family was able to purchase the Great Castle back, which had fallen into ruins and slowly new life awoke within the old walls.

The property complex includes a Baroque palace from 1720, the so-called Small Palace, which is less than a hundred years younger, and the manor farm museum. The entire estate is enveloped by a romantic park that is delineated by the Bobr River. The complex is run by the descendants of the pre-war owners who have elevated this gem from a total ruin. They have also ensured that Lomnica Palace today is an important local cultural centre.

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Mysłakowice, Poland
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Details

Founded: 1720
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wiktor Jacaszek (3 years ago)
Nice football pitch
Richard Coldman (3 years ago)
Excellent cuisine, service and surroundings. Fascinating history. Well worth a visit.
Max Maker (4 years ago)
Pretty average, restaurant is average at best and it is simply too expensive for what it is offering. I guess all the German tourists are being scammed into high prices.
Depth Hunter (4 years ago)
Place looks nice from outside, inside there's few palace rooms that have been renovated from which 2 of, are being used used as a shop of home decor -kinda not really a place for it. And the rest of ground floor and where you can find replicas of oil paintings and replicas of Louis XVI furniture that is mixed with modern Dutch or German leather furniture that was brought over from they're rubbish collections??? Totally messed up tho. And some basement place with mix of stuff that is used to represent 17th-19th century's tools of different use for the palace. Kinda strange thing I observe here that the place if in full focus on German tourists. I was thinking that Polish visitors should have actually bit more attention than all of us foreign guests - I see no local rates neither - obviously Polish families earn less than all of us earning $, £ or € - I have seen big families turning away once they have been asked to pay exact same amount of we were asked -10zl per head. And there's really not much to see. I would suggest the Australian or Singaporean approach to locals - locals pay nothing or what it is now and foreigners exactly same number of coins in €, £ or $. Trust this happens everywhere in the world. One more thing I haven't seen huge welome signs and commercial in Polish lingo while travelling west of Poland, while here everething is written in German -is this still Poland?
Frank G. S. (4 years ago)
One of the best renovated castles in the valley of Jelenia Góra. A small newly built mansion. Romantic, stylish, beautiful garden. Unfortunately no good view to the mountains (Śnieżka), a little hard to find.
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