Vang Stave Church

Karpacz, Poland

Vang stave church was bought by King Frederick William IV of Prussia and transferred from Vang in the Valdres region of Norway and re-erected in 1842 in Brückenberg near Krummhübel in Silesia, now Karpacz in Poland. It was originally used by a congregation belonging to the Church of Norway, then the Evangelical Church of Prussia, and now serves the Evangelical-Augsburg Church in Poland.

The church is a four-post single-nave stave church originally built around 1200 in the parish of Vang in the Valdres region of Norway.

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Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dawid Jozefiak (19 months ago)
Lovely view of the mountain range, and not a difficult walk. Although if you want to have a look inside the church it does cost about 10 złotych
Imperial Guard (19 months ago)
Very pretty small church. A narrator tells you its story on the inside. Quite informative!
Firat Koseoglu (19 months ago)
A great looking church which was exactly modeled (including the garden and graveyard) in the video game called Vanishing of Ethan Carter.
Tomasz Kurzewski (21 months ago)
Nice place with long history. Worth a visit while visiting Karpacz.
chris mckernan (2 years ago)
Beautiful church at bottom of mountain. Hard walk up but historic and worth visiting. Beautiful sorrounding landscape.
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