Kliczków Castle

Kliczków, Poland

Kliczków Castle was founded as a border fortress at the river Kwisa by Duke Bolko I of Jawor in 1297. In 1391, it fell into the hands of the Rechenberg family from Saxony, who held it for almost 300 years. The main building was built in 1585 in the Renaissance style.

After several more changes of ownership, it came to John Christian, Count of Solms-Baruth in 1767. In 1810, the grand ballroom in Empire style was created. In 1881, the architects Heinrich Joseph Kayser and Karl von Großheim from Berlin began an expansion of the castle. They mixed styles: English Gothic architecture with Italian Renaissance and French mannerism. An 80-acre English country garden was designed at the same time by Eduard Petzold. In 1906, Emperor Wilhelm II stayed at the castle while he was hunting in the area.

In 1920, it was inherited by Frederick of Solms-Baruth. During the Nazi period, he was engaged in resistance against National Socialism in the Kreisau Circle. He was arrested after the failed attempt on Hitler's life and his property was confiscated.

The castle survived the Second World War virtually unscathed, but the interior was looted by Soviet troops. In 1949, a fire destroyed the depot and the servants' quarters. In the 1950s, the castle was in the care of the local forest authority, which neglected the interior and ruined the stucco and the stoves. The former owner's horse cemetery was retained.

In 1971, the Wrocław University of Technology acquired the castle and tried in vain to save it. After the fall of Communism, a commercial company from Wrocław purchased the castle and developed it into a luxurious conference and recreation center that was opened in 1999.

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Kliczków, Poland
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Details

Founded: 1297
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carolyn Maldonado (19 months ago)
Fun castle and good ambience for a very reasonable price . Food was okay, nothing amazing. My issue was with the spa, only one person on staff! When you try to go book something, if they are with another customer you can't do anything. Front desk is no help, so make sure to reserve spa well in advance.
Mateusz Maćkowiak (2 years ago)
Awesome hotel, very cozy rooms,
David Mahsman (2 years ago)
Wonderful experience staying in a castle in Poland. The rooms are simple but functional, clean and comfortable. The public areas, especially the restaurant rooms, are magnificent. And the staff is friendly and helpful. I recommend it!
Darren Goldfinch (2 years ago)
Great place, a little expensive in the restaurant but a great place to visit, stable nearby to look at as well
Dawid Fraszczak (2 years ago)
Great place to come with your family and friends :)
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