Niesytno Castle

Bolków, Poland

The first mentioning of Niesytno Castle dates back to the 13th century, but it is not known by whom it was built. Legends tell of occupation by Hussite and mercenaries, and therefore it was also named Zakątek Strachu or Angstwinkel (Polish and German for 'corner of fear'). From the second part of the 15th century until the 17th century, the castle was inhabited by the 'von Zedlitz' lineage. It has been a military defense structure for several times. Later, the castle became a renaissance palace.

During the Second World War, German airmen (the luftwaffe) resided in the palace, preparing themselves for battle at the eastern front. The resistance used the palace as home during summer season. At that time it gradually turned into ruins. Thereafter, it was owned by the automobile manufacturer 'Fabryka Samochodów Ciężarowych' from Lublin. Some repairs were carried out at that time, though neighboring population stole the building materials little by little. The palace weathered until 1990.

On 2 July 1990, while belonging to Elizabeth Zawadzkie-Malickiej from 1984, it burned down due to arson, which ruined the palace. The current state of the buildings yield even more damage. Parts of the brick walls remained after the fire.

The buildings are not open for public, but it is possible to walk around the premises and get a glimpse of what is left of the buildings. The castle is located on a hill surrounded by forest, and the remainders of the tower of the castle are visible from some distance. Most of the other parts of the ruins are hidden behind trees. Some caves can be found around the ruins, which once probably were basement and other rooms.

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Bolków, Poland
See all sites in Bolków

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Darek Z (18 months ago)
Prace trwają, po odbudowie będzie to ciekawy obiekt. Nawet teraz warto go obejrzeć z zewnątrz.
Maciej Witkowski (18 months ago)
Po odbudowie będzie super
Grazyna Mordak (18 months ago)
Ciekawy duży obiekt obecnie w remoncie
Rajmund Sułkowski (20 months ago)
Może za 10 lat coś się zmieni z tym zameczkiem. Faktycznie, okolica jest piękna i warto zjechać z głównej trasy.
Marek Janczak (2 years ago)
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