The history of Cornatel castle dates back to the 9th century, although it was built on the site of ancient Roman remains. In 1211 Alfonso IX of León donated to the area to Knight Templars who rebuilt the castle. Subsequently it was owned by the Duke of Lemos. The castle is accessed by bordering the western section between the walls and the impressive cliff at the foot of the castle. Inside, exhibitions are held periodically.

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Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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www.turismocastillayleon.com

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio (2 years ago)
Sorprendente castillo reconstruido y bastante bien mantenido de origen templario, se asienta sobre un monte rocoso cortado hacia el este y el norte por un barranco, con casi 200 metros de desnivel, por el que transcurre el arroyo de Rioferreiros. Por sus otros dos flancos, que resultan de fácil acceso, está protegido por una sola muralla recorrida por un el paseo de ronda defensivo con almenas. Merece la pena visitarlo
Miguel Luís (2 years ago)
Great view, go to the seat, follow the same direction of the castle, best point in the area
Andrew Low (3 years ago)
Not much of a castle and still charges for entry
Antonio Dias (3 years ago)
One of the most beautifull views near Ponferrada.
Mark Auchincloss (4 years ago)
It's on Camino de Invierno.Interesting historical info & amazing views.
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