Royal Palace of El Pardo

Fuencarral-El Pardo, Spain

The Royal Palace of El Pardo is a historic building near Madrid, in the present-day district of Fuencarral-El Pardo. It is owned by the Spanish state and administered by the Patrimonio Nacional agency.

The palace began as a royal hunting lodge. It became an alternative residence of the kings of Spain until the reign of King Alfonso XII of Spain, who died in the palace in 1885.

King Henry III of Castile ordered the building of the pavilion in 1406, on Mount El Pardo, because of its abundant game. Later, in the time of Emperor Charles V (1547), it was transformed into a palace by the architect Luis de Vega. On 13 March 1604, a massive fire destroyed many of the paintings, including masterpieces by Titian. King Charles III of Spain renovated the building in the 18th century, appointing his architect Francesco Sabatini to undertake the job. It was newly transformed in the 20th century, doubling in size with the construction of an identical copy of the original structure to the east.

The interior decoration includes a ceiling frescoed by Gaspar Becerra, and paintings by Vincenzo Carducci and Cabrera.

In 1739 the palace hosted talks between the governments of Britain and Spain, who eventually agreed to the Convention of Pardo in a bid to avert a war. However, the Convention failed to prevent war breaking out shortly afterwards.

Generalissimo Francisco Franco lived in the palace after the Spanish Civil War. Since Franco's death, it has been used as a residence for visiting heads of state.

The Palace of Zarzuela forms part of the complex of residences at the site.

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Details

Founded: 1547-1558
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

mohan krishna (2 years ago)
Very nice place
Amelia LeBlanc (2 years ago)
Very cute and quiet day trip about 15 minutes from Madrid. Take the 661 bus from Moncloa. The palace isn't always open so check hours and dates before going. It's free Wednesday afternoons as well.
Andrew B (3 years ago)
The palace was very interesting and our guide was very sweet we were the only two English and they arrange for a special tool for us which I could not thank them enough the tour lasts about 1 hour and in October was not too busy certainly worth a visit and then a light lunch afterwards at one of the many restaurants nearby
b v (3 years ago)
Wonderful pieces enclosed this palace that you can visit. Wednesday is free
susan montaña montecalvo (3 years ago)
A beautiful place to spend the day with your love ones.
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