Masegra Castle

Sondrio, Italy

The imposing Masegra Castle was built in the Middle Ages and strategically positioned at the opening of the Valmalenco valley so it could easily control the access to the valley.

Since it was the property of the influential Salis family, it is the only castle in the town of Sondrio which wasn’t destroyed by the Grisons during their invasion of Valtellina in the 16th century.

As time went by, the castle lost its original defensive function and was converted from rough military outpost into an elegant residence more suited to a refined court, as testified by the frescoed rooms and beautiful loggias. Recently the castle’s stables have been converted into a historical museum, which gives visitors an in-depth look into aspects of life in Valtellina during the three centuries (1512-1797) of the Grisons’ occupation.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.in-lombardia.it

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ald domenic (16 months ago)
Attualmente è deludente e "vuoto", inoltre, molte sale non sono accessibili.. per settembre 2019, dovrebbero terminare le opere di restauro e allestimento degli interni con sale multimediali.. Vedremo ... e se del caso, modificherò la recensione..
Vittorio Renato De Marzi (20 months ago)
Ballissimo
Nazario Capetti (2 years ago)
Il "Castel Masegra"é una delle "tappe obbligate"per chi visita Sondrio. Discreto e silenzioso, sulla collina, protegge la città. Già, ora purtroppo non più, sede di distretto militare.Compagno di dolci memorie e giovanili ardori.
Giulia Franceschi (2 years ago)
Dalla zona piú antica della città parte la passeggiata non faticosa in salita che porta fino al castello. La vista ê molto bella peccato che il castello fosse chiuso. Forse è aperto solo in estate, non siamo riuscite a capire perché non ci sono tante info nelle vicinanze
Guido Zucchi (2 years ago)
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