Masegra Castle

Sondrio, Italy

The imposing Masegra Castle was built in the Middle Ages and strategically positioned at the opening of the Valmalenco valley so it could easily control the access to the valley.

Since it was the property of the influential Salis family, it is the only castle in the town of Sondrio which wasn’t destroyed by the Grisons during their invasion of Valtellina in the 16th century.

As time went by, the castle lost its original defensive function and was converted from rough military outpost into an elegant residence more suited to a refined court, as testified by the frescoed rooms and beautiful loggias. Recently the castle’s stables have been converted into a historical museum, which gives visitors an in-depth look into aspects of life in Valtellina during the three centuries (1512-1797) of the Grisons’ occupation.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.in-lombardia.it

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Veronica Bolognesi (4 months ago)
The place definitely makes a visit for the view and the exteriors. The museum, on the other hand, is worth the visit only if you are fond of mountaineering or interested in the local environment. That said, it's a great fun museum for kids because it has tons of interactive sections
Riccardo Tagliabue (5 months ago)
The castle can be reached with a quiet walk of about 20 minutes from the center of Sondrio. The visit to the castle was very interesting especially for those who love mountaineering as there is an interactive exhibition inside. Adjacent there is also a small exhibition dedicated to Carlo Mauri which I also recommend. The kindness and hospitality of the staff are priceless!
Marco Maria Lucchelli (9 months ago)
Easily accessible especially on foot. Panoramic point on the Sondrio basin and on the Orobie Valtellinesi. Yes you can visit the attached museum.
Carlotta Campagna (10 months ago)
Too bad that on our arrival it was closed for renovation.
Renata Rizzo (15 months ago)
The place is closed during summer, that's a shame
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