Masegra Castle

Sondrio, Italy

The imposing Masegra Castle was built in the Middle Ages and strategically positioned at the opening of the Valmalenco valley so it could easily control the access to the valley.

Since it was the property of the influential Salis family, it is the only castle in the town of Sondrio which wasn’t destroyed by the Grisons during their invasion of Valtellina in the 16th century.

As time went by, the castle lost its original defensive function and was converted from rough military outpost into an elegant residence more suited to a refined court, as testified by the frescoed rooms and beautiful loggias. Recently the castle’s stables have been converted into a historical museum, which gives visitors an in-depth look into aspects of life in Valtellina during the three centuries (1512-1797) of the Grisons’ occupation.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.in-lombardia.it

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ald domenic (11 months ago)
Attualmente è deludente e "vuoto", inoltre, molte sale non sono accessibili.. per settembre 2019, dovrebbero terminare le opere di restauro e allestimento degli interni con sale multimediali.. Vedremo ... e se del caso, modificherò la recensione..
Vittorio Renato De Marzi (15 months ago)
Ballissimo
Nazario Capetti (2 years ago)
Il "Castel Masegra"é una delle "tappe obbligate"per chi visita Sondrio. Discreto e silenzioso, sulla collina, protegge la città. Già, ora purtroppo non più, sede di distretto militare.Compagno di dolci memorie e giovanili ardori.
Giulia Franceschi (2 years ago)
Dalla zona piú antica della città parte la passeggiata non faticosa in salita che porta fino al castello. La vista ê molto bella peccato che il castello fosse chiuso. Forse è aperto solo in estate, non siamo riuscite a capire perché non ci sono tante info nelle vicinanze
Guido Zucchi (2 years ago)
Top
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kalozha Church

The Kalozha church of Saints Boris and Gleb is the oldest extant structure in Hrodna. It is the only surviving monument of ancient Black Ruthenian architecture, distinguished from other Orthodox churches by prolific use of polychrome faceted stones of blue, green or red tint which could be arranged to form crosses or other figures on the wall.

The church is a cross-domed building supported by six circular pillars. The outside is articulated with projecting pilasters, which have rounded corners, as does the building itself. The ante-nave contains the choir loft, accessed by a narrow gradatory in the western wall. Two other stairs were discovered in the walls of the side apses; their purpose is not clear. The floor is lined with ceramic tiles forming decorative patterns. The interior was lined with innumerable built-in pitchers, which usually serve in Eastern Orthodox churches as resonators but in this case were scored to produce decorative effects. For this reason, the central nave has never been painted.

The church was built before 1183 and survived intact, depicted in the 1840s by Michał Kulesza, until 1853, when the south wall collapsed, due to its perilous location on the high bank of the Neman. During restoration works, some fragments of 12th-century frescoes were discovered in the apses. Remains of four other churches in the same style, decorated with pitchers and coloured stones instead of frescoes, were discovered in Hrodna and Vaŭkavysk. They all date back to the turn of the 13th century, as do remains of the first stone palace in the Old Hrodna Castle.

In 2004, the church was included in the Tentative List of UNESCO"s World Heritage Sites.