Venetian Walls of Bergamo

Bergamo, Italy

The Lombardian city of Bergamo is composed of two parts, Città Alta (Upper Town), built up on the hills, and the Città Bassa (Lower Town), which is a lively financial, industrial and administrative centre of national importance.

A milestone in the history of Bergamo was its incorporation into the Venetian State in 1428, which lasted for over three centuries and a half. The two parts of city are separated, both physically and symbolically, by the powerful Venetian Walls, which were built by the Serenissima Republic of Venice in the second half of the 16th century to defend the city, which was the farthermost centre on the Mainland, close to the border with Milan's territory.

The walls never underwent any siege. That is why they remained almost intact to the present day. The system consist of 14 bastions, 2 platforms, 100 embrasures for cannons, 2 armouries, four gates, not to mention the underground structures featuring sallies, passages and tunnels.

 

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Founded: 1561
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Iva Fadrná (8 months ago)
Charming old town. Not so busy and noisy as other historic towns.
seniortiago (8 months ago)
I think I enjoyed this walk more than I expected. If you are around, worths a visit.
Elari Kivisoo (9 months ago)
Nice old town. Worth visiting.
Roberto Stelle (10 months ago)
Incredible experience. The great wall in Bergamo.. Why go to China?
lapyin ng (10 months ago)
A really nice small town with lots of historical architecture. I went up to the old town (Citta Alta) where you can overlook the whole Bergamo. The view was really really nice! Had a nice walk there although there were full of stones pavement.
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