Venetian Walls of Bergamo

Bergamo, Italy

The Lombardian city of Bergamo is composed of two parts, Città Alta (Upper Town), built up on the hills, and the Città Bassa (Lower Town), which is a lively financial, industrial and administrative centre of national importance.

A milestone in the history of Bergamo was its incorporation into the Venetian State in 1428, which lasted for over three centuries and a half. The two parts of city are separated, both physically and symbolically, by the powerful Venetian Walls, which were built by the Serenissima Republic of Venice in the second half of the 16th century to defend the city, which was the farthermost centre on the Mainland, close to the border with Milan's territory.

The walls never underwent any siege. That is why they remained almost intact to the present day. The system consist of 14 bastions, 2 platforms, 100 embrasures for cannons, 2 armouries, four gates, not to mention the underground structures featuring sallies, passages and tunnels.

 

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Founded: 1561
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrada Adelaida Patrascanu (4 months ago)
Great view! I had an amazing feeling seeing the town from above. Definitely a must!
Bao Bao (6 months ago)
Beautiful place. Great spot to enjoy Bergamo city from high view. Take bus No 1/1A to here from Bergamo station .
Francesco Lo Giudice (8 months ago)
When nature itself is the best filter...!!!
Larissa Topanotti (11 months ago)
A nice view of the city
Marco Ravasio (12 months ago)
Patrimonio dell'UNESCO Very, very good!
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