Palazzo Salis

Tirano, Italy

The Palazzo Salis is situated in the heart of the historic centre of Tirano, a small town in the valley Valtellina. The building got constructed during the second half of the 17th century by the noble family von Salis-Zizers, a branch of the important and well known grison family von Salis.

The palace was erected in the 1490s by Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan. The start of the construction is dedicated to Giovanni Salis-Zizers, who even became in the 1660s twice podestà of Tirano. About in the middle of the 17th century he bought and sold different properties to finally have the land to build his Palazzo. The entire structure of the Palazzo Salis is the result of the integration and change of already well established buildings, most probably already from the 15th or 16th century. The general style of the face of the building is a leftover of the facades of those 16th century buildings. The imposing doorway of the main entrance took its inspiration from a 16th-century design of the well-known architect Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola. The ground plan of the building is structured and organised mainly around two courtyards, named corte della meridiana (Sun-dial Courtyard) and corte dei cavalli (Courtyard of Horses).

The Palazzo is still in the hands of the family Salis and is run today as a Museum. More than ten rooms decorated with frescoes and stucco from the 17th and 18th century, as well as the hidden Italian Garden on the backside of the building are opened for the public.

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Address

Via Salis 3, Tirano, Italy
See all sites in Tirano

Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steven dosRemedios (2 months ago)
A 17th century Palazzo with beautifully restored frescoes, chapel and garden. The admission fee includes an audio tour describing each location. You probably won't spend more than an hour here but it is time well spent.
Janith Bogahawatta (3 months ago)
Calm and beautiful place
Alison Rostetter (3 months ago)
Fascinating + excellent bed & breakfast in historical palace.
John Bretz (2 years ago)
Note closed in winter. Refer to posted photos.
Giuseppe Citterio (2 years ago)
PALAZZO SERTOLI SALIS It is one of the most important in the province. It was created by uniting some buildings of the sixteenth century. The internal portico leads to an Italian garden, which is among the most interesting in Lombardy. Today the palace houses the Conti Sertoli Salis Winemakers
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