Haget, Christian Eriksson’s childhood home in Taserud, is scenically located within walking distance of downtown Arvika. The building was built in 1894 as the home and studio of Eriksson. It has been renovated and extended to include two exhibit wings that teem with works of art.

The house now serves as the museum’s entrance and café. Architect Rune Falk designed the museum. King Carl-Gustaf XVI officiated at the opening ceremonies on June 18, 1993.

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Address

Kungsvägen 11, Arvika, Sweden
See all sites in Arvika

Details

Founded: 1894
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

rackstadmuseet.se

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Green (7 months ago)
Well worth a visit.
Mats Ekblad (3 years ago)
A must see for visitors to get the cultural upside of Arvika
Niccolo Tognarini (3 years ago)
amazingly good little museum. well worth a visit
mihaela alexandrescu (3 years ago)
Small museum with interesting pieces both in the permanent & temporary exhibition
Tjark Hansberg (4 years ago)
Some of Sweden's most important artists. "Must-see" in Värmland. Also nice café and even interesting for children.
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