Wildeck Castle was built originally in the 12th century, by only the keep is left from that. Prince elector Moritz of Saxony had the medieval fortress re-designed into a hunting lodge between 1545 and 1547. The building is characterized be the tower “Slim Margarethe” with its curved roof hood and its dominant gables. Up until the year 1911, different hunting administrations had their seats at Zschopau’s castle. At the beginning, there were Dukes, followed by prince electoral and finally it became a hunter’s seat of the King of Saxony. Unfortunately, the ancient collection of hunting trophies does not exist anymore. However, according to an old register, there had been an assortment of 112 horns and antlers.

Throughout the 19th century, the eastern part of the building had been extended, in which the Expedition of the Kingly Court was located. Later, the district court moved in. In 1855, the western part of the castle was extended and a prison including a courtyard was accommodated there. Wildeck Castle was transferred into municipal ownership in 1994 and has been gradually restored since.

After extensive restoration throughout the last years, Wildeck Castle presents itself in its former glory. A variety of renaissance styled rooms, such as the Blue and White Parlour and the Red and Green Halls, have been re-opened for visitors and guests. 

Learn during a guided tour about the history of the fortress, be delighted by the beautiful view from the halls and the keep’s cisterns, and realize yourself the exposed position of the castle high above the river Zschopau. The baroque garden and the completely refurbished castle walkway with its scented roses, fruit trees sculptures and idyllic spots invite our guests to stay and calm down.

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Address

, Zschopau, Germany
See all sites in Zschopau

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Istvan Sabo (3 years ago)
Must visit museum for bikers!
Max Aa (3 years ago)
Top service
Maria Eugenia Maxia (3 years ago)
Molto interessante e istruttivo. Dalla torre si gode uno splendido panorama. Imperdibile la visita al museo
Pannu Singh (3 years ago)
Very nice place
Pannu Singh (3 years ago)
Very nice place
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