Meissen Cathedral

Meißen, Germany

The Meissen Cathedral is situated on the castle hill of Meissen, adjacent to the Albrechtsburg castle. It was the episcopal see of the Bishopric of Meissen established by Emperor Otto I in 968. It replaced an older Romanesque church. The present-day hall church was built between 1260 and 1410, the interior features Gothic sculptures of founder Emperor Otto and his wife Adelaide of Italy as well as paintings from the studio of Lucas Cranach the Elder. The first Saxon elector from the House of Wettin, Margrave Frederick I, had the Prince's Chapel erected in 1425 as the burial place of his dynasty. The twin steeples were not attached until 1909.

In 1581 the Meissen diocese was dissolved in the course of the Protestant Reformation, and the church was used by the Protestant Church since. It is the cathedral church of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Saxony.

Burials in the Prince's Chapel include many Electors and Dukes of Saxony.

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Address

Domplatz 1, Meißen, Germany
See all sites in Meißen

Details

Founded: 1260-1410
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dana Giurgea (9 months ago)
Magnific view
Stefan Leitner (2 years ago)
awesome historic place! The castle and the cathedral are a must for Visitors!
ruud waij (2 years ago)
To enter the Dom in Meissen, you need to pay for a guided tour. This kind of behavior does not bring me closer to God. There is a nice view above the city and the river.
Marc Albert (2 years ago)
The guides all say that it's a relatively small Cathedral but it doesn't look like it from the inside. There's a charge to enter but it's definitely worth seeing. If you're there around noon you can attend an organ concert for an extra fee. It's definitely worth it to pay extra for the guided tour of the bell tower. The climb is about 300 steps but it's not too taxing. The guide stops several times along the way.
Eric Pan (2 years ago)
Nice view, nice weather.
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