Meissen Cathedral

Meißen, Germany

The Meissen Cathedral is situated on the castle hill of Meissen, adjacent to the Albrechtsburg castle. It was the episcopal see of the Bishopric of Meissen established by Emperor Otto I in 968. It replaced an older Romanesque church. The present-day hall church was built between 1260 and 1410, the interior features Gothic sculptures of founder Emperor Otto and his wife Adelaide of Italy as well as paintings from the studio of Lucas Cranach the Elder. The first Saxon elector from the House of Wettin, Margrave Frederick I, had the Prince's Chapel erected in 1425 as the burial place of his dynasty. The twin steeples were not attached until 1909.

In 1581 the Meissen diocese was dissolved in the course of the Protestant Reformation, and the church was used by the Protestant Church since. It is the cathedral church of the Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Saxony.

Burials in the Prince's Chapel include many Electors and Dukes of Saxony.

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Address

Domplatz 1, Meißen, Germany
See all sites in Meißen

Details

Founded: 1260-1410
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karolina Bialoblocka (2 months ago)
Impressive. Well explained with videos.
Royal Mangalitsa (3 months ago)
Above the city you can find the Dom of Meißen and the castle
Sandra Neves (3 months ago)
Very nice Cathedral. Definitely recommend the 2€ guided tour to the bell tower. You can climb very high and the view is amazing.
Bob Parker (4 months ago)
Not a beautiful as some other churches. Still worth the experience. They have done a nice job adding some exhibit space with some of the history.
Sergey Tolokunsky (18 months ago)
Simply beautiful
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