Wolkenstein Castle

Wolkenstein, Germany

The Wolkenstein Castle developed historically by joining various older structures together. The tower with living quarters is the oldest part of the castle dating back to the 14th century, which was preceded by fortifications of unknown appearance. The kitchen building was expanded in the 16th century by the current dominating building parts: the South and North wings with gate house. Although much hints to the once necessary fortifications, the building ensemble is now considered a residence.

The museum at Wolkenstein Castle will give the interested visitor further glimpses into the history of the building and the city.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.stadt-wolkenstein.de

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniela M. (9 months ago)
Wolkenstein Castle is a hilltop castle from the 13th century (first mentioned in a document). Seat of Heinrich the Pious, a Wettin also of Albertine line. Later it went to his son August, who soon only used the property as a secondary residence. Today it serves as a venue for events and weddings. There is also an inn here. A lot is currently being built and restored here, and I'm excited to see the result. Great facility !!!
Rosemarie Uhlig (9 months ago)
Is being beautifully restored. We'll go back to Corona, unfortunately everything was still closed now.
Elli Kuhn (10 months ago)
The view from Wolkenstein Castle is really nice, the castle is cute but not big. However, it is currently so in need of construction that some of the site is full of site fences and scaffolding. At the moment I would rather recommend a visit to Scharfenstein Castle.
Goetz Hoffbauer (3 years ago)
Besichtigung lohnt, auch wenn z. Z. noch renoviert wird. Interessant ist auch die am Schloss täglich angebotene Greifvögel Vorstellung. Vorteil zusätzlich, Parkplätze sind kostenfrei vorhanden.
Ralf Förster (3 years ago)
Waren hier zum ersten Mal, hatten ein Ritteressen gebucht. Das war sehr lecker. Man sollte allerdings etwas Zeit mitbringen. Bedienung sehr freundlich und zuverlässig, wir kommen gerne wieder.
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Lorca Castle

Castle of Lorca (Castillo de Lorca) is a fortress of medieval origin constructed between the 9th and 15th centuries. It consists of a series of defensive structures that, during the Middle Ages, made the town and the fortress an impregnable point in the southeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Lorca Castle was a key strategic point of contention between Christians and Muslims during the Reconquista.

Archaeological excavations have revealed that the site of the castle has been inhabited since Neolithic times.

Muslim Era

It has not been determined exactly when a castle or fortress was first built on the hill. The first written documentation referring to a castle at Lorca is of Muslim origin, which in the 9th century, indicates that the city of Lurqa was an important town in the area ruled by Theudimer (Tudmir). During Muslim rule, Lorca Castle was an impregnable fortress and its interior was divided into two sections by the Espaldón Wall. In the western part, there was an area used to protect livestock and grain in times of danger. The eastern part had a neighbourhood called the barrio de Alcalá.

After Reconquista

Lorca was conquered by the Castilian Infante Don Alfonso, the future Alfonso X, in 1244, and the fortress became a key defensive point against the Kingdom of Granada. For 250 years, Lorca Castle was a watchpoint on the border between the Christian kingdom of Murcia and the Muslim state of Granada.

Alfonso X ordered the construction of the towers known as the Alfonsina and Espolón Towers, and strengthened and fixed the walls. Hardly a trace of the Muslim fortress remained due to this reconstruction. Muslim traces remain in the foundation stones and the wall known as the muro del Espaldón.

The Jewish Quarter was found within the alcazaba, the Moorish fortification, separated from the rest of the city by its walls. The physical separation had the purpose of protecting the Jewish people in the town from harm, but also had the result of keeping Christians and Jews separate, with the Christians inhabiting the lower part of town.

The remains of the Jewish Quarter extended over an area of 5,700 square m, and 12 homes and a synagogue have been found; the synagogue dates from the 14th century and is the only one found in the Murcia. The streets of the town had an irregular layout, adapted to the landscape, and is divided into four terraces. The synagogue was in the central location, and around it were the homes. The homes were of rectangular shape, with various compartmentalized rooms. The living quarters were elevated and a common feature was benches attached to the walls, kitchens, stand for earthenware jars, or cupboards.

Modern history

With the disappearance of the frontier after the conquest of Granada in 1492, Lorca Castle no longer became as important as before. With the expulsion of the Jews by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, Lorca Castle was also depopulated as a result. The castle was abandoned completely, and was almost a complete ruin by the 18th century. In the 19th century, the castle was refurbished due to the War of Spanish Independence. The walls and structures were repaired or modified and its medieval look changed. A battery of cannons was installed, for example, during this time. In 1931 Lorca Castle was declared a National Historic Monument.

Currently, a parador (luxury hotel) has been built within the castle. As a result, archaeological discoveries have been found, including the Jewish Quarter.